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Page 5 of 6, showing 10 records out of 59 total, starting on record 41, ending on 50

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from Rhode Island, as he was traveling on the East Coast, to his wife in Kansas Territory, reporting on his efforts to fundraise for the creation of a college in the Territory. Goodnow thought he should "be able to put the college, through right, by staying East long enough." He made mention of contribution amounts he had garnered already, and was sending the cash home.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from his travels in Ohio to his wife, Ellen, in Shannon, Kansas Territory. This letter serves as a good example of the many than Goodnow sent home to his wife during his travels in the States, as he fundraised for the construction of Bluemont College and a non-denominational church in Manhattan. In this instance, Goodnow answers the request of his friend, Joseph Denison, to return to the Territory early, without raising the remaining $500; Goodnow replied that is would "diminish his self respect" to do so, but asked his wife her opinion. He also gave her instructions for maintaining their land and homestead, imploring that she contract out as much work as possible, in order to ease her own duties.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from Nebraska City, Nebraska Territory, to his wife Ellen in Kansas Territory. Goodnow was traveling in order to raise money and support for the construction of a college in Manhattan. He was positive about the prospects, but also felt the whole endeavor was an "uphill business." Goodnow thought that, with his friend Joseph Denison as General Financial Agent, the idea would go through.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from New York City to his wife in Shannon, Kansas Territory. This letter is one of many written from Goodnow to Ellen which update her on the status of his travels and fundraising. This particular example includes a mention of Goodnow's desire to solicit the support of Henry Ward Beecher, whose pamphlet "Defence of Kansas" speaks passionately against allowing slavery in the Territory.

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Joseph Denison

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from his travels in New England to Joseph Denison. Goodnow was concerned that the finances of the College were being handled carelessly, as he had received word that city taxes had been paid on College lots when it was his understanding they were not even eligible to be taxed. He also stressed that the building supply accounts be kept organized. Goodnow included checks amounting to $150 with his letter to Denison.

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Joseph Denison to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Denison, Joseph, 1815-1900

Joseph Denison wrote from Parkville, Missouri, to Isaac Goodnow, who was traveling . Denison reported that his solicitations for support of a college in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, had recently been well received. Among the interested parties were C. Evans and P. Judson of Evanstan, Illinois, who had been successful in building up Northwestern University in that area. Samuel Pomeroy also conveyed his interest, having pledged an investment to the cause on behalf of the New England Emigrant Aid Company.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

Samuel Pomeroy wrote to Isaac Goodnow from Atchison, Kansas Territory. Pomeroy told Goodnow he was not disposed at the moment to come to Manhattan on account of lawsuits and railroad business, but would come as soon as possible. He looked forward to being present when the cornerstone of the Bluemont College building was placed, and asked Goodnow to list him as a subscriber to Manhattan's new newspaper. Pomeroy also referred to the upcoming election the following June, which would determine the delegates to attend the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention, and prayed for a successful outcome.

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Robert Allyn to Isaac Tichenor and Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Allyn, Robert, 1817-1894

Robert Allyn wrote from Providence, Rhode Island, to his friends Isaac and Ellen Goodnow in Kansas Territory. Allyn, like Goodnow an educator, updated the couple on the construction of a new local Academy. He also reacted to news he had heard of political conditions in K.T., having found that "the papers are full of dreadful things about you horrid abolitionists in Kanzas", and asking him, "How do you contrive to live under the Missouri laws?" Showing himself to be a staunch Abolitionist as well, Allyn provides his own strong opinions and insights regarding the Kansas troubles. Allyn also advised that "getting up a few. . .free schools" would prompt a great rush of emigration from the Northern States to the Territory

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Mamie Luella Williams

Portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, an elementary school teacher and principal in Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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Mamie Luella Williams

Christopher Studio, Topeka, Kans.

This is a portrait of Mamie Luella Williams, 1894-1986, principal of Washington School, Topeka, Kansas. In 1965 she was appointed to the Kansas Commission on the Status of Women, served as a delegate to the 1971 White House Conference on Aging, and was active on the Senior Citizens Advisory Council for the Republican Party for Kansas, 1974-1976. She received the Washburn University Distinguished Service Award in 1973, and an honorary doctorate in mathematics from Washburn in 1982. Williams Science and Fine Arts Elementary Magnet School at 1301 S.E. Monroe, Topeka, Kansas, was named in honor of Ms. Williams.

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