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Page 6 of 9, showing 10 records out of 87 total, starting on record 51, ending on 60

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Alfred and Edgar Huidekoper

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder and prominent citizen of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote to Alfred Huidekoper and Edgar Huidekoper, old associates from Meadville, Pennsylvania, to tell them of investment opportunities. He described rural claims, Town Act investments, and loans. He gave examples of large returns, including those gained by former governor Andrew H. Reeder. The time was ripe since Kansas' free statehood seemed certain, the land was titled, securities were assured, and financial difficulties had left some land and property owners with no option but to sell sacrificially. Holliday also confirmed the discovery of gold in western Kansas Territory (now Colorado).

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Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Morton related that the fall emigration had begun, Quindaro was crowded, and more buildings were being constructed than ever before. Morton also had found two men interested in renting the home owned by Hill upon its completion. He suggested that it would be best to "keep things quiet" about Samuel N. Simpson, and asked, on the behalf of Guthrie, if Hill planned to travel again to Quindaro.

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John Doy and rescue party

DaLee, Amon Gilbert

On January 25, 1859, free state activists Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence, and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, he was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the ambrotype are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay, and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The ambrotype was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After a loving introduction, he described Kansas Territory's sunny, breezy climate. Holliday mentioned letters received from his brother and Mr. Thomas Willson, both named in previous letters, who also wanted to emigrate. He described the principle building in Topeka, which served as meeting hall, hotel, and church, and where he slept with Frye W. Giles, a free state supporter from Chicago. Holliday ended with concern for Lizzie, Mary Holliday's younger sister.

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John E. Stewart reminiscence

Stewart, John E

This undated document, presumably written by John E. Stewart, relates the author's experiences in Kansas Territory. The reminiscence begins with a description of how he entered the territory and the manner in which he constructed a house. Then, intermixed with accounts of his agricultural efforts and other day-to-day activities, there are brief mentions of the political situation in the territory. The main focus of the document then turns to when Stewart was a member of the Wakarusa Liberty Guard, including a description of the murder of Charles Dow, the murder of Hoyt, the Branson rescue, and other encounters with border ruffians.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday, founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. After three weeks at the future site of Topeka, Holliday was glad for city comforts. He mentioned the site's beauty, the prospect of building a house on his farm claim, and his personal success since leaving Meadville. On December 18, 1854, he had been unanimously elected President of the Topeka Town Association and appointed temporary agent of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The bottom two-thirds of page 3 and 4 (which contained Holliday's signature) have been cut and removed.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

A formal portrait of Cyrus Kurtz Holliday (1826-1900), of Topeka, Kansas. Holliday came to Kansas Territory in 1854 from Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was an agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company, one of the founders of Topeka, and was the first president of the Topeka Town Association. He was very active in territorial political activities, including the Topeka movement, he was a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention, and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1861. Holliday was also the first president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and served as one of the railroad's directors for nearly 40 years.

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unknown writer to Hiram Hill

The author of this letter, most likely Henry F. Parker, wrote to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, communicating to Hill roughly the amount of property taxes he owed and seeking confirmation of the specific lot numbers Hill owned.

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R.C. Brant to Hiram Hill

Brant, R.C.

R.C. Brant, a Baptist missionary who had settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, wrote to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding the use of Hill's land. Brant owned a town lot next to Hill's, and wished to make improvements to his land, which would require that he use Hill's lot. Brant explained that he had many visitors coming and going who would see the beauty of the area and might be inclined to settle in the area if he be allowed to improve his own lot. A note at the end of the letter supports Brant's credibility as a permanent citizen of Lawrence who had already made improvements to the town.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania reported the contents of a letter her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, had received from William D. Paul of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Cyrus was speaking in New Castle, PA on the behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Paul wrote that Harry G. Young was living in Cyrus' Topeka house. Milton C. Dickey and Dr. George A. Cutler had returned to Topeka without weapons, to the disappointment of the "Topeka boys," who anticipated conflict with Missourians. Mary recommended reading the New York Times. She wrote of her dissatisfaction with their separation and readiness to emigrate to Kansas Territory.

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