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Page 6 of 8, showing 10 records out of 74 total, starting on record 51, ending on 60

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Sherman, Ewing and McCook Attornies at Law to Mess Walker

Sherman, Ewing & McCook

A letter to Mess Walker, Williams & Miller, of Weston Missouri, regarding the payment of a debt that should be paid promptly to the firm of Sherman, Ewing & McCook, Attorneys at Law.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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W.T. Sherman, Thomas Ewing, & McCook, to George B. Parker

Sherman, Ewing & McCook

Although unclear as to the exact nature of the litigation, this letter from the Leavenworth firm pertained to the taking of depositions in "the case against the steamboat Isabella". The Isabella was a side-wheeler which made regular runs to Sioux City during 1858, and in this case apparently came to the aid of the Kate Howard when ice forced her to "give up her trip".

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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James S. Emery

Bowman, photographer,

James Stanley Emery had a law practice in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. He was associated with the New England Emigrant Aid Company and worked as a journalist for the "New York Daily Times." He was involved in numerous free state activities both in Kansas Territory and in the East.

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Joseph Skubitz

Photo of Joseph Skubitz, 1906-2000, Pittsburg, Kansas, Republican who served in the U. S. House of Representatives, 1963-1978.

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Members of the Topeka Kansas Bar Association

This black and white photograph shows a panel with members of the Topeka Kansas Bar Association. On the first row, in the middle, is an image of a young Charles Curtis.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from "Steamer Robert Campbell Jr. near Liberty Mo.," is addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes how his fellow troops have become more experienced soldiers "who fight for liberty and law." He discusses the march from Fort Riley to Fort Leavenworth and conditions on the boat that was taking them further south. He also mentiones William Brown's new law position with former Kansas Territory governor Wilson Shannon.

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