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Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
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Page 6 of 7, showing 10 records out of 61 total, starting on record 51, ending on 60

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Henry Worrall with his guitar

Grigs, A. D.

Guitarist and artist Henry Worrall moved to Topeka, Kansas, in 1868 and died there in 1902. This photograph shows a youthful Worrall standing with his guitar. The photo was probably taken during Worrall's residence in Ohio in the 1850s or 1860s and reproduced later in Topeka by A. D. Griggs, as the border bears his imprint. Worrall's celebrated solo guitar instrumentals "Sebastopol" and "Violet Waltz" enjoyed great popularity in the nineteenth century. In the early twentieth century, Worrall's popular solo guitar pieces played a key role in the development of the guitar styles of southern rural folk musicians and country and blues musical idioms.

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Henry Worrall

Henry Worrall was an early Kansas artist who lived in Topeka, Shawnee County, Kansas. An inscription on the back of the photograph reads as follows: "Prof. Henry Worrall, born Liverpool, England. Most expert wood carver, artist - designer, guitarist, composer of Sebastopol, Violet Waltzes, Etc., resided in [XXXXXXXX], Ohio & Topeka, Kansas, U. S. A."

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John Doy and rescue party

DaLee, Amon Gilbert

This black and white photograph shows John Doy and his rescue party. On January 25, 1859, Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory for Nebraska with thirteen slaves. They were captured twelve miles outside of Lawrence and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The Doys were arraigned at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, when they were taken to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, his son, Charles, was set free. The jury however could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, Doy was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the photograph are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The photograph was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.

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Christopher Kit Carson

McMillen, Z. P.

This is a carte de visite showing Christopher Kit Carson, explorer, trapper, Indian agent, and scout. Carson explored the west to California and north through the Rocky Mountains. He lived among and married into the Arapaho and Cheyenne tribes. He was hired by John C. Fremont as a guide, and led the expedition through much of California, Oregon and the Great Basin area. He achieved national fame through Fremont's accounts of his expeditions. During the Mexican-American war from 1846 to 1848, Carson was a courier and scout, celebrated for his rescue mission after the Battle of San Pasqual and for his coast-to-coast journey from California to Washington, DC to deliver news of the war to the U.S. government. In the 1850s, he was appointed Indian Agent to the Ute and Jicarilla Apaches. In the Civil War, he led a regiment of mostly Hispanic volunteers on the side of the Union at the Battle of Valverde in 1862. Later during the Indian Wars, Carson led armies to pacify the Navajo, Mescalero Apache, and the Kiowa and Comanche Indians.

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Sara Robinson

Portrait of Sara Tappan Doolittle Robinson, author, Free-State activist, and wife of Charles Robinson. This photograph was copied from an ambrotype taken in 1857. See Kansas Memory item 3996 for a color version.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This incased ninth plate tintype shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok (1837-1876). The legendary lawman and gun-slinger began his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also worked as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeded him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok was elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he served until 1870. In 1871, he was hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earned fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok was killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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Thomas John Wood

Portrait of Captain Thomas John Wood, U.S. Army, First Cavalry station at Fort Scott in 1858. Wood and a deputy U.S. Marshall arrested members of Colonel Harvey's free-state party after the Battle of Hickory Point. The captives were taken to Lecompton where they were imprisoned and charged with murder. About twenty of Harvey's soldiers were tried, convicted, and sentenced.

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Kate Edwards Swayze portrait

This is a photograph of Kate Edwards Swayze, who was born in London, England on November 24, 1834. She married American J. Clarke Swayze on June 22, 1856 in New York and they had two children. She was an actress and playwright, and among her plays was Ossawatomie Brown. Kate died on August 13, 1862 in Griffin, Georgia, survived by her husband and three children.

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Edmund Gibson Ross

Portait of Edmund Gibson Ross, U.S. Senator from Kansas. Ross helped raise and then served in the Eleventh Kansas during the Civil War. After James H. Lane's death by suicide in 1866, Ross was appointed and subsequently elected to the Lane seat in the U.S. Senate. While serving as senator from Kansas in 1868, Ross won fame as the senator who cast the deciding vote for acquittal in the impeachment trial of President Johnson.

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This incased sixth plate tintype portrait shows James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok (1837-1876). The legendary lawman and gun-slinger began his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also worked as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeded him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok was elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he served until 1870. In 1871, he was hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earned famed for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok was killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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