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Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 6 of 26, showing 10 records out of 259 total, starting on record 51, ending on 60

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel F. Lyman to Hiram Hill

Lyman, Samuel F.

Samuel Lyman wrote from Northampton, Massachusetts, to Hiram Hill, also in Massachusetts, regarding Hill's responsibility to raise money for aid to Kansas. Lyman reminded Hill of the suffering occurring in the Territory. He added in a postscript that although Samuel Pomeroy had recently delivered provisions to people in KT, they were only enough to last a few days.

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E. R. Falley to Kansas Central Committee

Falley, Edwin R.

In this undated letter from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, E. R. Falley informs the Kansas Central Committee that he had lost a gun loaned to him by "Mr. Wilder" (D. W. Wilder?) while serving with a free-state militia company at Blanton's bridge (Napoleon B. Blanton, on the Wakarusa River in Douglas County) in June 1856. Wilder was demanding payment, and Falley asks the committee to reimburse "Mr. Wilder for said gun."

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Central County Kansas Committee to the People of the county of Onondaga, New York

Hebbard, Russell

The inflamatory rhetoric of this printed circular provided an antislavery perspective of events in Kansas. It urged the residents of central New York to provide aid to Kansas settlers. It also described plans to encourage a "a large emigration into the territory" to aid free state supporters living there but to also increase the number of "legal voters" for the fall elections. The chairman of the Central County Kansas Committee was Russell Hebbard. The document listed the names of other officers and committee members.

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Red Cross nurse, Iola, Kansas

Gibson, Arthur

This formal portrait shows a woman dressed as a Red Cross nurse from Iola, Kansas. According to the back of the photograph, she was a member of a theatrical group in Iola.

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Billings & Bryant to John Brown, bill of sale for horse wagon

Billings & Bryant,

The state of Iowa frequently served as a relatively safe haven for abolitionist John Brown and his followers during the late 1850s, and Iowa City was on the famous Lane Trail which carried many free-state activists and settlers to and from Kansas. This document, from "Billings & Bryant," indicates that the partners had received $100 from John Brown as payment "in full for a heavy Horse Waggon" that they agreed "to ship immediately to J B Iowa City, Iowa; care of Dr. Jesse Bowen." Bowen was a member of the Kansas Central Committee of Iowa who later lived in Leavenworth, Kansas Territory.

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Kansas Central Committee payment to Jacob Willits

Kansas State Central Committee

On January 7, 1857, the Kansas Central Committee paid $12.64 to Jacob Willits of Shawnee County, Kansas Territory, for this itemized supplies bill.

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Francis Tomes and Sons to Thaddeus Hyatt, receipts

These two receipts, from Francis Tomes and Sons, New York, detail supplies acquired to benefit the free state cause. They include the prices of Bowie knives, Colt pistols, and other pieces pertaining to the use of firearms.

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Mary Bailey Sweet

This black and white photograph shows Mary Bailey Sweet benefactress of Washburn University in Topeka Kansas. The daughter of Timothy Bailey Sweet and Annie Brown Sweet she graduated from the College of Sisters of Bethany in Topeka and was valedictorian of the class of 1898. Mary attended Washburn College from 1900-1901, as a music student before graduating from the University of Kansas in 1903. After graduation, she taught at the Methodist Deaconess Training School in Chicago from 1903 to 1910 and later at the Methodist School for Girls in Rome, Italy from 1912 to 1914. During her stay in Italy Mary also worked with the Red Cross assisting with World War I efforts. At the close of the war, Mary returned to the United States to teach at the Methodist Deaconess school in Seattle, Washington where she taught for several years before returning to Topeka, Kansas. Mary became an active member of the community and to Washburn College. In 1952, Mary and her sisters Susie and Annie established the Sweet Foundation in memory of their brother Paul. The endowment provides scholarships to young men and women who attend Washburn. In 1955 Mary established the Sweet Summer Sabbatical Fund. With this endowment faculty at the university are given the opportunity to broaden their teaching experiences during the summer months through travel and research. Mary's commitment to education also extended into the community. She taught adult Sunday School classes at the First Methodist Church and was a member of numerous organizations including the Kansas Authors Club, and the Topeka Art Guild. Mary died on April 3, 1964 at the age of eighty-five.

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William Hutchinson

Clinedinst

A portrait of William Hutchinson, a journalist and correspondent for the New York Times, Chicago Tribune, St. Louis Democrat and Washington Republic, he covered events in Kansas from 1855 through the early 1860s. He settled in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Hutchinson served as secretary of the Kansas Central Committee and assisted with efforts to send emigrant parties and relief to Kansas Territory. He was first identified with the abolition or free-soil party, until the Republican party organized. Hutchinson was a member of the Wyandotte Constitution Convention and was an early and persistent advocate of temperance and other reforms.

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S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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