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Page 7 of 20, showing 10 records out of 193 total, starting on record 61, ending on 70

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Edmund B. Whitman to George L. Stearns

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

This rather lengthy report from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, addresses many issues, especially those surrounding the Lecompton constitutional controversy. With "the Topeka Movement . . . abandoned," the question is what would take its place to resist the Lecompton Constitution if it were accepted by the Congress. The territorial legislature had formally "protested against the admission of Kansas into the Union under the Lecompton Constitution," and "the Mass of the people are determined" to resist its imposition. Whitman makes many other interesting observations about the political situation regarding Democrats and Republicans and even abolitionists: "men who seek here and now, on this issue, to break the back bone of slavery forever." In addition to the political, Whitman describes his "labor of distributing the clothing . . . for the relief of Kansas," and discusses in some detail the financial situation regarding the Committee, his personal debt, Kansas relief, and support to John Brown.

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Statement on the Central Committee

Undersigned Citizens of Kansas Territory, John Stroup (first signature),

This document, signed by Kansas Territory citizens from the Lawrence area, deplores the condition of the Central Committee's room and office. These citizens claim that they were mistreated,and that the relief effort should be placed in more benevolent hands. They ask that the National Kansas Committee "remove the present incumbents and apoint persons Who have Some feeling for poor Suffering humanity." It concludes with a list of signatures.

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Report of the majority, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

This report, written by the majority party of the Senate select committee investigating the Exodus, outlines the majority?s conclusions about why Southern blacks were emigrating to the North during the post-Civil War period. This committee, composed of majority and minority parties, had taken testimony from hundreds of people having direct knowledge of the exodus movement. In essence, the majority party (the Democrats) concluded that blacks in the South had not emigrated due to ?any deprivation of their political rights or any hardship in their condition? in their home state. Furthermore, the report maintained that aid societies in the North (such as the Freedmen?s Aid Association of Topeka) were working with the Republican Party to encourage black emigration for purely political means. The majority party was composed of three senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), and George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio).

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Kansas--Help! Help!

Lawrence Citizen

This circular was composed of two parts. The first section was a letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to the National Kansas Committee, that asked for help because of the conflict in Kansas, stating that "instant action alone can save our people from destruction." The letter briefly mentioned the recent attack on Lawrence, and the proslavery forces which were gathering and organizing. Although there was a lull in the fighting, the citizens of Lawrence were looking for assistance and relief. The second part was a response written by H. B. Hurd, secretary of the National Kansas Committee, encouraging emigration to Kansas but raising the possibility that free state settlers in the territory must at times defend their rights. He wrote that "Kansas is now in a state of open war."

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy, Abstract of Report

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

Abstract of Report Showing the Operations of the Kansas Territorial Relief Committee to January 1, 1861

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George Cutter, Kansas experience

This reminiscence is presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, which was compiled by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. George Cutter was with Frederick Brown shortly before the Battle of Osawatomie and, like Brown, he was wounded during an altercation with border ruffians from Missouri. While Cutter was not directly involved in this battle, this reminiscence is still a rather fascinating account of it.

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Thaddeus Hyatt letters

Hyatt, Thaddeus

These two, incomplete, excerpts of letters written by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, describe the early workings of this committee and its efforts for the free state cause. Copy No. 3 discusses the "Tabernacle Committee" and the appropriation of side arms and Sharps rifles. Copy No. 4 refers to J. M. Winchell, authorizing him to make a withdrawal from the New York Kansas Fund. [The first page of the letters, which is included in the text version, was not scanned for display on this web site.]

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Letters from Thaddeus Hyatt. The Drouth in Kansas universal! The last crop gone! No buckwheat! No vegetables! No corn! No seed of any kind! No bread! No money! No Hope! What is to be done? (No. 3)

Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, writes to the "New York Tribune" to make New Englanders aware of the destitution and suffering of settlers in Kansas Territory. Hyatt gives accounts of conditions in Americus and Emporia townships in Breckenridge County and also in Jackson County and Lawrence. The letter reports the condition of crops, cattle disease, etc. It contains similar information to other statements made by Kansas settlers during the drought of 1860.

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Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas. The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! (No. 1)

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This item is titled "Thaddeus Hyatt's Letters from Kansas, The fact of the Drougth. Introduction of the facts, an appeal and an apology! Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, tries to dispel reports coming from Leavenworth that conditions in Kansas Territory were being exaggerated. He feels efforts to deny "the present deplorable condition of things" are motivated by economic concerns. Hyatt writes that they suffered because of the drought, not their own actions, and that the free North should aid them. The letter contains a great deal of emotional rhetoric. The letter was copied (by hand) by W. F. M. Arny. The last page of the letter describes its origins.

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T. W. Higginson to William Hutchinson

Higginson, Thomas Wentworth

This letter and accompanying list of forthcoming relief supplies (shirts, dresses, over coats, etc.) is directed to William Hutchinson, "Treasurer Kanzas Committee," by Thomas Wentworth Higginson of Brattleboro, Vermont. Three boxes of clothing had been sent, and Higginson reminds Hutchinson that it was "very important that in this case & in all cases, prompt acknowledgement should be made of the receipt of everything contributed to Kanzas." People need to know that their contributions were getting through and that they were appreciated.

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