Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Collections (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 7 of 20, showing 10 records out of 199 total, starting on record 61, ending on 70

| 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

H. B. Hurd to Thomas W. Higginson

Hurd, H. B.

H. B. Hurd was secretary of the National Kansas Committee in Chicago, Illinois. He writes this letter to Reverend Thomas W. Higginson in Worcester, Massachusetts, from the committee's office in Chicago. The main focus of the letter revolves around Higginson's plan of operation to garner support from free state governors. Hurd offers advice about which governors to approach first, also stating his opinion on various related matters. Included in the letter is another sheet, outlining Higginson's "Points to be suggested to the Executives of the States." The back of this sheet has some other notes and doodling.

previewthumb

H. J. Williams to Florella Brown Adair

Williams, H. J. (Mrs. John)

Mrs. Williams had been a member of one of Rev. Samuel L. Adair's churches in Lafayette, Ohio. She writes Mrs. Adair about her concern for the Adair family during all of the troubles in Kansas Territory. She and her husband also sent some cheese and cloth to the Adairs. The letter has references to various family members and demonstrates the support women settlers in Kansas Territory received from friends in the East.

previewthumb

Harriet S. Crandall to Thaddeus Hyatt

Crandall, Harriet S.

This letter, written by Harriet S. Crandall from Alfred Centre, New York, gives an idea of Clarina Nichols' involvement in the free state cause, specifically her lectures to the public. After hearing one of these lectures, six ladies from this town were appointed to oversee the collection of relief funds for free state settlers in Kansas. They had already collected clothing, bedding, and money for the cause.

previewthumb

Harvey Bostwick Hurd to John Brown

Hurd, H. B.

From Chicago, National Kansas Committee secretary H. B. Hurd sent John Brown a copy of a resolution passed by the committee on April 1, 1857: first, in light of the fact that the public was no longer contributing to the cause, the committee could not continue its normal operations; and second, the secretary was to inform major donors that the committee would necessarily close "operations unless immediately sustained by liberal Contributions." Thus, Hurd could not send Brown the $500 dollars requested (apparently to cover the first payment to Charles Blair for the "spears").

previewthumb

Harvey Bostwick Hurd to Theodore Hyatt

Hurd, H. B.

This letter was written by the secretary of the National Kansas Committee, H. B. Hurd, to Theodore Hyatt, whose brother was chairman of this committee. The most noteworthy aspect of the letter is the letterhead, which included a listing of the members of the committee, the executive officers, and their hometowns. It also included the address of their Chicago office.

previewthumb

Henry Adams to William Hutchinson

Adams, Henry J., 1816-1870

Henry J. Adams was in Washington, D. C., as a special agent of Kansas Territory attempting to convince the U.S. Congress to pay claims for damages suffered by Kansas citizens during episodes of violence in the territory. Adams reported on the prospects of getting the claims paid during the upcoming session of Congress as well as on his concerns about being compensated for his lobbying efforts. He expressed particular concern that Charles Robinson intended to cheat him out of his pay. Adams also commented on Abraham Lincoln's election as president, and the possible secession of Southern states in response to the election results.

previewthumb

Henry and Clara Smith to John P. St. John

Smith, Henry and Clara

Henry Smith and his daughter, Clara, wrote this letter to Kansas Governor John St. John requesting information about black emigration to Kansas. Smith wrote on behalf of his community in Marshall, Texas, saying that a number of people were hoping to emigrate because they were unable to make a living due to discriminatory practices. According to the letter, some of the Smith's white neighbors were threatening to follow black emigrants if they attempted to leave the area (to what end is unclear). In addition to his role as Kansas governor, St. John served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen's Relief Association.

previewthumb

Hiram Hill to S. G. How

Hill, Hiram, 1804-

Hiram Hill wrote from Williamsburgh, Massachusetts, to S. G. How, of the "Kansas Committee for Receiving and Dispersing" funds. Hill inquired how and in what manner any money sent to Kansas would be applied: "I have some money in my hand and we can rais [sic] more if we can have any prospect of its getting to Kansas and doing any good".

previewthumb

Horace White to John Brown

White, Horace

On National Kansas Committee letterhead, assistant secretary Horace White wrote Brown from Chicago to say that the items Brown had requested were being gathered and shipped.

previewthumb

I. L. Wilde to C. P. Williams

Wilde, Isaac L.

Isaac L. Wilde, writing from New York City, described to C. P. Williams, chairman of the New York State Kansas Committee, the difficulties he was experiencing in recruiting individuals to emigrate to Kansas.

previewthumb
| 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11|

Collections

Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief

Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material