Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Home and Family -- Daily life (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief (Remove)
Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable (Remove)
Page 7 of 9, showing 10 records out of 87 total, starting on record 61, ending on 70

| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols, receipt

Nichols, Clarinda I. Howard

This receipt, given to Clarina Nichols by her audience in Naples, New York, declares that the thirty-six dollars she received after her speaking engagement was for Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Nichols had been giving lectures on the free state cause as an agent of this emigrant aid company.

previewthumb

1880 census of Rock Creek Township, Wabaunsee County, Kansas

United States. Census Office. 10th census, 1880

This excerpt of a census schedule provides details--including the name, age, race, and occupation--of settlers in Rock Creek Township in Wabaunsee County, Kansas. The county included a black population (B=Black) who had settled there in 1879 with the help of the Freedmen's Relief Association.

previewthumb

Thaddeus Hyatt

Thaddeus Hyatt was an abolitionist and served as head of the National Kansas Committee in 1856. He was also involved in efforts to provide relief to settlers in 1860.

previewthumb

Elias D. Porter to Thaddeus Hyatt

Porter, Elias D.

Elias Porter, writing from Oriskany, New York, informed Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee, about a box of provisions sent to W. F. M. Arny, an agent with this committee. The letter includes an itemized list of the materials send to aid the free state settlers residing in Kansas.

previewthumb

James Mead to his father

Mead, James R. (James Richard), b. 1836

James R. Mead writes this letter from his ranch and trading post near the Saline River to his father in Davenport, Iowa. He vehemently declares that the stories about suffering settlers in Kansas Territory were "bare-faced lies." He wishes that those in the East would stop sending relief supplies because "it all goes into the hands of favorites" and Kansas would be better off without it. He also provides his father advice, telling him to appreciate his home in Iowa and to stay out of the way of any enemies. These typed copies of the James R. Mead's letters were donated to the Kansas State Historical Society by Mr. Mead's family in 1940 when the originals were still owned by the family. The originals are now held by Wichita State University.

previewthumb

Clarina Irene Howard Nichols to Thaddeus Hyatt

Nichols, Clarinda I. Howard

This brief letter, written by Clarina Nichols from Elmira, New York, informed Thaddeus Hyatt of her successful speaking tour in Pennsylvania. She was also eager to hear more details about the National Kansas Committee's work in the territory.

previewthumb

National Kansas Committee letter

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

This printed letter is from the National Kansas Committee. Its purpose is to solicit money, supplies, and settlers for the Kansas Territory. It provides details on these efforts. Also, it mentions Colonel Buford's expedition to the territory and speculates on Southern motives.

previewthumb

S.P. Hand, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, a part of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was apparently collected by the president of the National Kansas Committee, Thaddeus Hyatt. It relates the tale of S. P. Hand, a soldier in the free state militia who took part in the battle of Fort Titus and was captured at the battle of Hickory Point. His account provides a great deal of information regarding troop movements and the workings of the free state militia.

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

In this rather lengthy letter from his home in Sumner, Ingalls commented on many different facets of his personal and professional life to date in Kansas Territory and about his prospects for the future; these included his law practice (now mostly in Atchison), his interest in journalism and politics, and his interest in a variety of speculative opportunities. The future of Kansas looked good to Ingalls, despite continued problems with drought that was forcing many to sell out.

previewthumb

Testimonies of Samuel Nickel and Miles Morris

These testimonies, taken down by the National Kansas Committee (possibly by Thaddeus Hyatt), relate the Kansas Territory experiences of Samuel Nickel and Miles Morris, including their personal backgrounds. Nickel's claim was burned to the ground by Missourians, and he was forced to hide in the woods for fear they would take his life. The testimony of Miles Morris describes his settlement on Pottawatomie Creek.

previewthumb
| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9|

Home and Family -- Daily life

Community Life -- Clubs and organizations -- Charitable -- Relief

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material