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Page 7 of 29, showing 10 records out of 284 total, starting on record 61, ending on 70

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College

This is Edward Ray Sloan's diploma from Campbell College, Holton, Kansas, where he received a degree of Bachelor of Laws. Edward Ray Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904; however, Campbell's program lasted only two years and the Kansas Board of Law Examiners required a three-year course before taking the bar exam, so he entered Washburn College law school and graduated in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.

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Wilson Shannon to John A. Halderman

Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877

Wilson Shannon was an Ohio Democrat who preceded John W. Geary as governor of Kansas Territory (August 1856--August 1857) and was considered a proslave partisan. Shanon writes John Halderman from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, regarding some legal matters--specifically, "some land warrants" being sent to Halderman in Leavenworth. Attorney John Halderman was trusted and respected by men on both the anti- and pro-slavery sides.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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Paul R. Wunsch

Wunsch, Paul Robert, 1901-1980

This campaign letter from Republican candidate Paul R. Wunsch reminds state employees to vote for him in the August 4th primary election for Kansas Governor. The letter goes on to state how he advocated, during his twenty-eight years of legislative service, for salary increases for state employees and his support for the Kansas Public Employees Retirement System. A yellow flyer is included with newspaper headlines from across the state endorsing his candidacy.

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William F.Rightmire

This is a portrait of William F. Rightmire, an attorney, who came to Kansas in 1887, and practiced law in Larned, Cottonwood Falls, and Topeka. In 1888, he was nominated by the Union-Labor Party of Kansas as its attorney general candidate. Two years later in 1890, Rightmire was nominated as the People's Party candidate for Chief Justice of the Kansas Supreme Court.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Kansas Civil War Centennial correspondence

This collection consists of incoming and outgoing correspondence, news releases, addresses and remarks, logistical and planning materials, invitations and confirmations or declinations, copies of historic materials and other reference materials, and other such records related to the Kansas Civil War Centennial Commission, of which Alan W. Farley was member and chairman of this particular activity. The records specifically relate to the centennial celebrations held at Independence Hall in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, re-enacting Kansas' entry into the United States and flag-raising as the 34th state in 1861. The documents are mostly arranged roughly in reverse chronological order and include correspondence with various militia units and patriotic organizations. Kansas was celebrating the centennial of statehood in 1961, also, so there is some communication with the Centennial Commission in this correspondence.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

On the first leg of his move to Sumner, Kansas Territory, John J. Ingalls, a 24-year-old Massachusetts lawyer, wrote this brief letter from Boston, Mass., to his father, Elias T. Ingalls. Here Ingalls wrote regarding the fare and "the best method of getting West."

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Harry Walter Colmery

This is a portrait of Harry Walter Colmery (1890-1979) dressed in his World War I uniform. Colmery was an attorney in Topeka, Kansas, an American Legion National Commander, and author of the G. I. Bill of Rights.

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