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Page 8 of 16, showing 10 records out of 156 total, starting on record 71, ending on 80

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

H. B. Hurd to James Blood

Hurd, H. B.

From Chicago, Illinois, H. B. Hurd inquires about reports that the Kansas legislature was to appoint a committee to investigate the conduct of the National Kansas Committee's agents and their handling of relief funds and supplies. Several correspondents had expressed similar concerns during the fall of 1860--that is, concern that funds were being misused or that certain agents could not be trusted. Hurd encourages Blood to support such an investigation.

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A. Venard to Thaddeus Hyatt

Venard, A.

This letter is from A. Venard, a medical doctor from Pleasant Grove, Kansas Territory, who wrote to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter described the sickness and disease that plagued the settlers along the Verdigris River in southeast Kansas. Dr. Venard had worked diligently to aid the settlers, even using funds from his own pocket to purchase medicine, but he requested that the committee give him 100 dollars worth of drugs. Attached to this letter is an itemized list of the drugs he wished purchased with the requested funds.

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S. Chamberlin to Thaddeus Hyatt

Chamberlin, S.

This letter, written by S. Chamberlin, President of the LeRoy Kansas Aid Society, was addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee. This aid society in LeRoy, New York, was formed after a lecture presented by H.D. Northrup, an agent of the National Kansas Committee. The author immensely praised the speaking abilities of Northrup, likening him to the great orator Henry Clay. Chamberlin was firmly convinced that, if Northrup canvassed the North, he would be able to stir the hearts of Northerners in support of free state cause. This society also collected clothing and money to send to the free state settlers in Kansas.

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Edmund Burke Whitman to Samuel L. Adair

Whitman, E. B. (Edmund Burke), 1812-1883

Whitman writes from (presumably) Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to ask Samuel Adair for his assistance in distributing remaining relief clothing before winter. He includes instructions for notifying the public of the availability of relief goods and indicates that whomever Adair "knows to be in absolute want" should have first priority. Whitman feels the task of distribution would not take longer than one week. He also wants Adair to estimate the number of poor families in his [Adair's] community.

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Joseph Pomeroy Root to William Hutchinson

Root, Joseph P., 1826-1885

Root, writing from Topeka, Kansas Territory, requests $100 from the Kansas Central Committee to fund information-gathering activities in northeastern Kansas Territory. Root also speculates on the potential for military action in the territory in the late summer of 1856.

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Testimonies of Nathaniel Parker, Horace L. Dunnell, Hinton S. Dunnell, Alexander MacArthur, James Hall, Jerome Hazen, and Charles Henry Caulkins

Hyatt, Thaddeus

These testimonies, presumably taken by Thaddeus Hyatt of the National Kansas Committee, include personal information about each settler, such as their age, occupation, etc. They describe their experiences in Kansas Territory and their involvement in border warfare and skirmishes with pro-slavery settlers. Each account is descriptive and provides tremendous detail about their individual experiences. The testimonies of MacArthur, Hall, and Hazen are combined into one, with this group testimony split into two separate sections.

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Augustus Wattles to Thaddeus Hyatt

Wattles, Augustus, 1807-1876

This letter, written from New York by Augustus Wattles, was addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The main focus of the letter was on two proslavery men--Captain Doake and General Clark--who persisted in mistreating free state settlers along the Missouri-Kansas border. The letter also referred to Charles Jennison and to James Montgomery, whose band of free state militiamen was still active even into 1860. Wattles vehemently maintained that free state forces were only organizing for their own protection, not for a great insurrection as the Missourians believed.

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William Frederick Milton Arny

W. F. M. Arny was active in numerous territorial Kansas activities, serving as an agent for the National Kansas Committee and as a delegate to the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention. He was a member of the 1858 territorial legislature and of the Topeka legislature. The identification on this photograph indicates that this is a disguise he used in Missouri in 1856.

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Albert D. Searl to Thaddeus Hyatt

Searl, Albert D

The author wrote from Tabor, Iowa to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. He began the letter by mentioning a skirmish between pro-slavery and free state forces somewhere between Lawrence and Topeka. This correspondence also deals with emigrant settlements within the territory, the shipment of weapons and provisions, and the morale among the emigrants as they struggled to make ends meet. Furthermore, Searl mentioned a great deal about James Lane and his activities within Kansas Territory.

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Mrs. Holmes, letter

Holmes, Mrs.

This moving letter, presumably written by Mrs. Holmes, related the daily experiences of her family during 1861. They were struggling to make ends met, and her father did not want to seek help from back East. They had lived in Lawrence for five years, and she briefly mentioned their sickness and suffering during 1856. She applauded the work of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, and his willingness to obtain provisions and assistance for the impoverished settlers in Kansas Territory.

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