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Page 8 of 13, showing 10 records out of 125 total, starting on record 71, ending on 80

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter A. Huxman with a group of women from the Kansas Democratic Party. He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later as the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. In 1936, Huxman was nominated and elected as the Democratic governor of Kansas. Failing to be re-elected for a second term, he left office on January 9, 1939. On April 24, 1939, President Franklin D. Roosevelt nominated Huxman to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

These three sepia colored photographs show Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972). He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. Elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas, he served one term from 1937 to 1939. Failing to be reelected, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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Michael Westernhouse Sutton

A portrait of Michael Westernhouse Sutton, an Atchison, Topeka & Santa Fe Railroad attorney in Dodge City, Kansas. Sutton, a prohibitionist, worked against his friend William Barkley "Bat" Masterson during the liquor war of 1886. Also, he served in the Kansas House of Representatives in 1893 representing District 97.

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William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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Solon Otis Thacher

Mettner Studios of Lawrence

A photograph of Solon Otis Thacher, a lawyer, who came to Lawrence, Kansas Territory in July, 1858. In 1859, he was elected as a delegate to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention. After Kansas became a state, he was elected judge of the fourth judicial district. Thacher served in the state senate in 1881-1884 and 1893-1895, and was a candidate for Governor in 1864 and 1882. In 1884, President Arthur appointed him a member of a commission to negotiate treaties with South American countries. Thacher was president of the Kansas State Historical Society in 1895.

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Albert McDonald Cole

This black and white photograph shows Albert McDonald Cole. A lawyer and a county attorney from Jackson County, Kansas. Cole began his political career, in 1941, when he was elected to the Kansas Senate as a representative for the counties of Atchison and Jackson. He served in the legislature until 1945 before successfully being elected to the U.S. House of Representatives from Kansas' first congressional district, (1945-1953). In his 1952 bid for re-election, Cole was narrowly defeated but the loss was attributed to his support for the construction of the Tuttle Creek Dam. After his career in Kansas politics came to a close, Cole later served during the Eisenhower adminsitration as Administrator of the Housing and Home Finance Agency (1953-1959). From 1959 to-1961, he served as vice president of Reynolds Aluminum Service Corp. and president of Reynolds Metals Development Corp.(1961-1967).

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Warren Wirt Henry Lawrence

Rockwood

A photograph of Warren Wirt Henry Lawrence, a lawyer, who came to Kansas in 1857 and settled in Franklin County. He was elected to the 1861 state legislature and in 1862, Lawrence was elected secretary of state. He left Kansas in 1868 and worked for the Denver & Fort Worth Railroad.

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