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Page 8 of 212, showing 10 records out of 2116 total, starting on record 71, ending on 80

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel Reader lanternslide

Reader, Samuel J.

Hand painted lanternslide depicting a dentist's office, inside a handmade wood frame. Slide depicts a man having a tooth pulled by a dentist. The slide can be manipulated so the dentist appears to yank the tooth with a forceps. Part of a collection made by Samuel Reader between 1866 and 1913. Reader was a Kansas farmer who was active in the early Topeka community. He built two homes, served in the Civil War, and wrote in a diary nearly every day for 64 years. Reader began painting slides in 1866 and continued throughout much of his life, holding magic lantern shows for the local community in his house and at church.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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The pretty Harvey Girl beside my chair

A photograph copied from the Santa Fe Employee Magazine showing a Harvey Girl standing by a customer who is looking at a menu.

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Thomas Bayne Wilson

A photograph showing Thomas Bayne Wilson being sworn in as United States Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Transportation.

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Thomas Bayne Wilson

A photograph of Thomas Bayne Wilson seated at his desk. After reaching the rank of general, he left the military in 1944, returning to his civilian position as chairman of the board of TWA until 1947, then served one term in the Kansas House of Representatives from Jefferson County. After the 1948 session of the Kansas Legislature, he challenged incumbent U.S. Congressman Albert M. Cole (1st District) in the August Republican primary but lost. In 1950 he entered federal government service as regional director, Defense Materials Procurement Agency, with the rank of Minister (Diplomatic). In 1955, he became United States Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. Wilson later served on the Civil Aeronautics Board and was chairman of the board and director of Resort Airlines.

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Frederic Remington

Frederic Remington took art classes as a freshman at Yale. He decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884 he married Eva Caten. Unhappy with Remington's cartoons at the time and his involvement in the saloon, she returned to New York. Alone amid failing businesses, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Frederick Lee Hall

Hetzel Photo Lab, Dodge City, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Lieutenant Governor Fred Lee Hall (1916-1970), campaigning for governor in Dodge City, Kansas. Hall's platform was calling for reform to clean up Topeka, Kansas, similarly to President Eisenhower's efforts to clean up Washington, D. C. In the November general election he defeated his Democratic challenger George Docking to become the thirty-third governor of Kansas, serving from 1955 to 1957. Hall served one term as governor and was unsuccessful in his attempt for a second term. He resigned in the final days of his administration on January 11, 1957 accepting the appointment as justice of the Kansas Supreme Court from 1957 to 1958 before stepping down to run for the governor?s office again. After being unsuccessful, he retired from his political career.

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Frederic Remington

A photograph of Frederic Remington working in his studio. He took art classes as a freshman at Yale, and he decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884, he married Eva Caten. She became unhappy with Remington's cartoons and his involvement in the saloon so she left and returned to New York. Alone amid a failing business, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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George Washington Brown

Medlar

A photograph of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Topeka statehouse press corps with Governor Mike Hayden

This is a photograph showing Governor Mike Hayden with members of the statehouse press corps. The photograph was taken when Governor Hayden was leaving office.

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