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Page 8 of 16, showing 10 records out of 156 total, starting on record 71, ending on 80

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Jotham Meeker to Rev. Lucius Bolles

Meeker, Jotham, 1804-1855

In this letter Jotham Meeker, a Baptist missionary to the Shawnee in Indian Territory, discussed the Ottawa Indians who were residing on Shawnee lands. Meeker spoke to several Ottawa chiefs about spreading the Christian gospel, and he hoped that he could work among them as a missionary. Also, Meeker discussed how the Ottawa may be forced to move once other tribes take possession of land in Indian Territory. He also mentioned the Methodist mission established among the Potawatomi. Reverend Lucius Bolles, the recipient of this letter, was Meeker?s contact at the Baptist Board of Foreign Missions.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He described living conditions in Topeka. Holliday expressed his intent to write to Mr. McFarland and his thanks for letters recently received. He mentioned Samuel Y. Lum, a Congregational minister, who was sleeping in his cabin. He also mentioned his presidency with the Topeka Town Association, agency with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and his own business. Finally, Holliday expressed hopes of a sawmill and referred to the possibility of trouble with Missourians. A few lines have been cut and removed from the lower part of pages 7 and 8.

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William Addison Phillips to John Brown

Phillips, William A. (William Addison), 1824-1893

To "Jas. Smith" (that is, John Brown), William A. Phillips wrote from Lawrence that he would likely not be able to meet Brown en route to KT at Tabor, Iowa, but would arrange for a few others to do so. Phillips believed Brown "should come into Kansas" if he wanted to but "there is no necessity for active military preparations now."

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

In this draft letter, Samuel Adair writes from Hudson, Ohio, discussing his plans to meet with a "Massachusetts Emigrant Aid Society" party in Chicago. Adair indicates his family consisted of four people and describes the quantity of boxes and luggage they would bring with them. He also writes that he disapproved of traveling on the Sabbath.

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William Morris Davis to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Davis, William Morris

William Morris Davis, a Quaker and abolitionist from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, who was speaking in PA. In response to a report Holliday sent of their work on behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont, Davis sent $500.00 reimbursement to Holliday and William Y. Roberts, also of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Davis mentioned Jefferson Davis, secretary of war in President Franklin Pierce's administration and a Missouri slave owner. (March 4th, 1857 was the day James Buchanan took presidential office.)

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Isaac Tichenor Goodnow to Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow

Goodnow, Isaac T. (Isaac Tichenor), 1814-1894

Isaac Goodnow wrote from his travels in Ohio to his wife, Ellen, in Shannon, Kansas Territory. This letter serves as a good example of the many than Goodnow sent home to his wife during his travels in the States, as he fundraised for the construction of Bluemont College and a non-denominational church in Manhattan. In this instance, Goodnow answers the request of his friend, Joseph Denison, to return to the Territory early, without raising the remaining $500; Goodnow replied that is would "diminish his self respect" to do so, but asked his wife her opinion. He also gave her instructions for maintaining their land and homestead, imploring that she contract out as much work as possible, in order to ease her own duties.

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William R. Clark to Isaac Goodnow

Clark, William

William Clark wrote from New England to Isaac Goodnow in Manhattan, Kansas Territory. Clark responded to a letter sent to him earlier by Goodnow, in which Goodnow asked Clark if he would act as a financial officer of Bluemont College. Clark declined the invitation. He admitted he had reasons that might motivate him to accept, but that he had "so little adaptation as to that [work] of begging money." He also feared, considering the present economic conditions in New England and within the Methodist Church, that he would not be successful in garnering any support for a college in the Kansas Territory, as local [New England] interests currently prevailed. He stated "Did there exist an immediate want for a College in Manhattan, the case would be entirely different. But I judge that for ten years to come an Academy would meet nearly all the educational wants of that region."

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Shawnee Sun (Siwinowe Kesibwi)

Lykins, Johnston, 1800?-1876

This photo static copy of the Shawnee Sun represents the first newspaper printed in Kansas (then known as Indian Territory). The paper was written in the Shawnee alphabet created by Johnston Lykins, a Baptist missionary to the Shawnee Indians. The newspaper lists John Gill Pratt as publisher. The original paper copy of this issue is held by the LaBudde Special Collections Department, Miller Nichols Library, University of Missouri-Kansas City.

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G. W. Paddock diary

Paddock, G. W.

G. W. Paddock was a minister and free-state supporter who came to Kansas Territory in 1857. He describes his daily activities and his religious work, as well as his impressions of the city of Wyandotte while the constitutional convention was meeting there. His entries for this time period indicate he visited the convention, although he does not discuss the substance of the proceedings. The 1857 portion describes some of the free state controversies. He also mentions working with American Indians; however, his descriptions are often stereotypical and uncomplimentary. A number of entries from this diary were selected, but the entire diary is not included.

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Elam Bartholomew diary

Bartholomew, Elam

Elam Bartholomew was a resident of Rooks County and Hays, Kansas. He was a horticulturalist, internationally known for his work with fungi. His diary reflects his active participation in Republican Party politics, local government, the United Presbyterian Church, farm organizations, and experimental farming. Elam Bartholomew was born in Pennsylvania, and his family moved first to Ohio and then Illinois. In 1873, he became engaged to Rachel Montgomery. Bartholomew settled in Rooks County, Kansas, in 1874, and returned to Illinois to marry Montgomery in June, 1876. The Bartholomews returned to Kansas in September, 1876, and lived on their farm on Bow Creek in Rooks County until 1929. They then moved south to Hays, Kansas, in Ellis County, where he served as curator of the mycological museum at Fort Hays Kansas State College until his death in 1934.

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