Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 8 of 29, showing 10 records out of 284 total, starting on record 71, ending on 80

| 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Elisha J. Scott

Elisha J. Scott, 1890-1963, was raised in Topeka's Tennesseetown. As a youth, he possessed a strong drive and a quick wit, which attracted the eye of prominent Topeka minister Charles M. Sheldon. With financial support from Sheldon and his own abilities to succeed, Scott earned his law degree from Washburn College in 1916. During his long career as an attorney, he argued many civil rights and school segregation cases throughout Kansas and the Midwest. Two of Scott's sons, John and Charles, joined him in his law firm of Scott, Scott, Scott, and Jackson. Together they helped to prosecute, at the local level, the landmark civil rights case of Brown v. Topeka Board of Education.

previewthumb

Commercial Street, Lyons, Kansas

This photograph shows businesses along Commercial Street between East and West Avenues in Lyons, Kansas. Towards the right side of the picture are Swensson Drugs and, just a little farther to the right, Rexall Drugs. Other businesses visible include (from left to right) Chandler National Bank, Anderson Lunch, Groceries and Meats: A Home Grown Store, a lawyer's office, Jones Bakery, a furniture store, a men's wear store, and J. C. Penney Company. Three automobiles are visible parked along the street.

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

previewthumb

Salmon P. Chase

Salmon P. Chase was the Governor of Ohio from 1855 to 1860. As an attorney, he defended fugitive slaves and was active in the antislavery and free soil movements. He later served as Secretary of the Treasury under Abraham Lincoln. This image was taken later in his life.

previewthumb

Governor Payne Harry Ratner

This portrait represents Payne Harry Ratner. Ratner was the first resident of Labette County to be elected as County Attorney, holding office from 1923 to 1927. After serving as County Attorney, he went on to serve in the Kansas State Senate from 1929 to 1939, and then later served two terms as Kansas Governor from 1939 to 1943. Notable programs during his administration was implementing a teachers? pension plan and a state employee merit system.

previewthumb

Franklin George Adams' Residence, Topeka, Kansas

A sepia colored photo of Franklin George Adams' residence on the S.W. corner of Fifteenth and Mulvane streets in Topeka, Kansas. F. G. Adams, one of Kansas' most prominent settlers, was a free-stater and member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of 1858. In 1862, he drafted the law providing for the organization of the state's agriculture society and served for three years as the society's secretary. In addition to his appointment as agriculture secretary, Adams was Clerk of the United States District Court from 1863 to 1864. Following this position, Adams was appointed United States Indian Agent to the Kickappos from 1865 to 1869. Adams' greatest and lasting contribution as a public servant was his appointment, in 1875, as secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. During his tenure as secretary, Adams dedicated his time and effort to build the society's collection of original documents for future generations to study and interpret the state's history.

previewthumb

Keith George Sebelius

This is a photo of Keith George Sebelius of Norton, Kansas. Sebelius served as Republican State Senator, 1962-1968, and in the U. S. House of Representatives, 3rd District, 1969-1981.

previewthumb

A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood

Beach, A. J.

As in his earlier letter to Samuel Wood of April 22, A. J. Beach, of Beach Valley, Kansas Territory, describes his Cow Creek bridge dispute with William Edwards and O. G. Stanley. In this letter, Beach officially retains the services of Wood & Perkins to sue Edwards and Stanley for damages. "I can prove," wrote Beach, "that they have asked trains to cross their bridge, taken toll on it, and repaired it with the avowed intention of making it a free bridge and taking the travel away from mine." Beach claims to be losing $20 a day in tolls.

previewthumb

Harry Brice, Cimarron, Kansas

This is a photograph of Harry Brice, an attorney from Cimarron, Kansas. Brice, a Democrat, represented District 120, in the 1915 Kansas House of Representatives.

previewthumb

Vern Miller and Brian Moline

Heinemann, David

A photograph showing Vern Miller, former Kansas Attorney General and Sedgwick County attorney and sheriff, and Brian Moline, an attorney, former chairman of the Kansas Corporation Commission and a Wichita state legislator. The photograph was taken at the Kansas State Historical Society's annual meeting.

previewthumb
| 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12|

Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Curriculum

Date

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Home and Family

Military

Objects and Artifacts

People

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation

Type of Material