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Page 9 of 23, showing 10 records out of 226 total, starting on record 81, ending on 90

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Edward B. Smythe to Hiram Hill

Smythe, Edward B.

Edward Smythe wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding his experiences in Manhattan. Smythe described his journey West and his newly established lumber business. He found the people of Manhattan to be enjoyable and prosperous. Smythe illustrated their character by describing the ladies' festival planned for the coming week, in which funds will be raised to defray the expenses of constructing a beautiful new schoolhouse. He added that he would now begin his search for a "better half".

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William Henry Avery and family

A photograph of Governor William Henry Avery and his family on the snow covered lawn in front of the Governor's mansion, Cedar Crest. The photograph was used on the Governor's Christmas card. Avery was born August 11, 1911 near Wakefield, Kansas, and graduated from Wakefield High School and the University of Kansas. A Republican, Avery served in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1950 to 1955. In 1954, he was elected to the United States House of Representatives and served until 1964. During his 10 years in Congress, he served on numerous committees. In 1964, Avery was elected the 37th governor of Kansas. He served one term as governor, losing a re-election bid to Robert Docking in 1966. After an unsuccessful bid for the United States Senate, Avery returned to private life.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Vale & Gates ranch, Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory

Steele, F. M. (Francis Marion), 1866-1936

View of men, women, and children standing in front of a long ranch house on the Vale and Gates ranch in western Beaver County, Oklahoma Territory.

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Marijana Grisnik

Grisnik, Edward

Marijana Grisnik seated on her front porch, Kansas City, Kansas.

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Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the preliminary sketches by Regionalist artist John Steuart Curry, (1897-1946), for the rotunda at the statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. The sketches were a reflection of the "historic struggle of man with nature" and how the hand of erosion was moving toward the abandoned farm house. These panels were to be commissioned into murals for the second chapter in the state's history. However, the proposals never became a reality because of the controversy surrounding Curry's earlier projects "Tragic Prelude" and the "Kansas Pastoral" which illustrated the first and third chapters in the state's history on the second-floor of the capitol.

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Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the preliminary sketches by Regionalist artist John Steuart Curry, (1897-1946), for the rotunda at the statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. The sketches are a reflection of the homestead and the building of barb wire fences. These panels were to be commissioned into murals for the second chapter in the state's history. However, the proposals never became a reality because of the controversy surrounding Curry's earlier projects "Tragic Prelude" and the "Kansas Pastoral" which illustrated the first and third chapters in the state's history on the second-floor of the capitol.

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Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the preliminary work on a portion of the statehouse mural entitled "Tragic Prelude" by Regionalist artist John Steuart Curry, (1897-1946). Located north of the archway on the second-floor of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas, the mural illustrates a bison hunter with a slain bison and thundering herds of bison in the background. The mural's dimensions are 22 feet long and 11 1/2 feet high.

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Capitol, Topeka, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the preliminary sketches by Regionalist artist John Steuart Curry, (1897-1946), for the rotunda at the statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. The sketches are a reflection of the sacrifice of life on the Santa Fe Trail and the oil field industry and were to be commissioned into murals for the second chapter in the state's history. However, the proposals never became a reality because of the controversy surrounding Curry's earlier projects "Tragic Prelude" and the "Kansas Pastoral" which illustrated the first and third chapters in the state's history on the second-floor of the capitol.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Governor Walter Augustus Huxman, (1937-1939), signing a bill to legalize the sale of 3.2 beer. People in the photograph are (left to right): Milt Tabor, Topeka Capitol reporter; Samuel Terbovich, Huxman's pardon attorney; unidentified man; Lew Larkin, Kansas City Journal-Post reporter; Gil Mayo, Associated Press; and Max (last name unknown).

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