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Page 9 of 20, showing 10 records out of 199 total, starting on record 81, ending on 90

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Thomas Bedoe, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

The testimony of Thomas Bedoe, a portion of the Journal of Investigations of Kansas, was apparently collected by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. It describes in detail the time Mr. Bedoe spent serving in the free state militia in the Osawatomie and Lawrence areas. He was a part of the Battle of Osawatomie and this account provides valuable information about the events preceding the battle.

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J.M. Rankin to Thaddeus Hyatt

Rankin, J. M.

J.M. Rankin wrote this letter from Emporia, Kansas Territory to Thaddeus Hyatt, chairman of the National Kansas Committee. It discussed how the drought of 1860 was affecting Emporia and expressed thanks for the support of the National Kansas Committee.

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Henry and Clara Smith to John P. St. John

Smith, Henry and Clara

Henry Smith and his daughter, Clara, wrote this letter to Kansas Governor John St. John requesting information about black emigration to Kansas. Smith wrote on behalf of his community in Marshall, Texas, saying that a number of people were hoping to emigrate because they were unable to make a living due to discriminatory practices. According to the letter, some of the Smith's white neighbors were threatening to follow black emigrants if they attempted to leave the area (to what end is unclear). In addition to his role as Kansas governor, St. John served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen's Relief Association.

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S. H. B. Schoonmaker to Governor John P. St. John

Shoonmaker, S. H. B.

S. H. B. Shoonmaker of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, wrote this letter to Governor St. John on behalf of the black residents of his parish (county). He asked the governor a number of specific questions, including how these black emigrants could obtain land, where they should settle, and whether there were relief organizations that could assist the refugees. In addition to his service as governor, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Charles M. F. Striger to Governor John P. St. John

Striger, Charles M. F.

In this letter Charles Striger, a radical Republican from Kentucky, expresses his concern for free blacks in the South. With rather forceful language he berates Southern Democrats for their harassment of blacks. He also asks Gov. St. John to convince the North that it is their duty to aid any refugees seeking solace from Southern white oppression.

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Wilmer Walton to John P. St. John

Walton, Wilmer

This letter, by the correspondent for the Labette County Freedmen?s Relief Association in Parsons, Kansas, described the condition of black refugees in the area. Walton thanked Governor John P. St. John for his financial support, and explained how Walton had been visiting the suffering refugees and distributing aid as best he could. He also encouraged the governor to continue supporting relief efforts. St. John, in addition to his official duties as governor, was a board member of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Andrew Atchison to John P. St. John

Atchison, Andrew

In this letter, Andrew Atchison updates Kansas governor St. John on the condition of the Exoduster settlement near Dunlap, Kansas. Benjamin Singleton had established this colony in May, 1878, and according to Atchison, the black refugees (numbering around 200 families) were thriving. Another goal of Atchison?s letter was to investigate the ?practicability? of establishing a Business and Literary Academy in addition to their free public school. Atchison and some other white residents of the area had formed the Dunlap Aid Association to assist the Exodusters? efforts to obtain land and employment.

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Thaddeus Hyatt to Amos Adams Lawrence

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This letter was written from New York by the president of the National Kansas Committee, Thaddeus Hyatt. He was writing to Amos Lawrence about the committee's efforts to relieve the suffering of free state settlers in Kansas Territory. Apparently, a shipment of clothing to Kansas contained a number of articles that were well worn and of little use. Hyatt also spoke of the need for agricultural implements, cattle, and seeds to end the suffering of the settlers.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

This letter was written by S. C. Pomeroy of the Kansas Relief Committee, one of several aid committees that had been formed to ease the suffering of settlers in Kansas. This particular committee specifically sought to send relief funds and provisions into Kansas during the drought of 1860. The letter is addressed to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee, keeping him informed about the efforts to distribute food and clothing. Pomeroy appreciated the help he had received from Hyatt, but he was disappointed in Dr. Webb. The last page of the letter has been crossed out and edited.

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W. F. M. Arny to William Hutchinson

Arny, W. F. M. (William Frederick Milton), 1813-1881

From Chicago, Illinois, William F. M. Arny, general agent for the National Kansas Committee, informs William Hutchinson of a shipment of relief goods that would arrive soon at Leavenworth, Kansas Territory. Arny writes that he had given James Blood several thousand dollars "to purchase goods in St. Louis," and Arny was on his way East to raise more.

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