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Page 9 of 218, showing 10 records out of 2177 total, starting on record 81, ending on 90

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Topeka statehouse press corps with Governor Mike Hayden

This is a photograph showing Governor Mike Hayden with members of the statehouse press corps. The photograph was taken when Governor Hayden was leaving office.

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David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace to William Kincaid

Brewer, David J. (David Josiah), 1837-1910

A letter written by David J. Brewer and C. B. Brace, Leavenworth, Kansas, to Reverend William Kincaid, minister of the Congregational Church in Rushville, New York, encouraging him to become the minister of the First Congregational Church in Leavenworth, Kansas. The letter describes the church and invites Rev. Kincaid to spend time with the congregation. He accepted the position and served from the fall of 1870 through January, 1876. Brewer was a lawyer. During his distinguished legal career, he was a Kansas Supreme Court Justice,1871 - 1884, United States Circuit Court Justice, 1884 - 1889, and United States Supreme Court Justice, 1889 - 1910.

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George Washington Brown

A portrait of George Washington Brown, who in the autumn of 1854 moved to Lawrence, Kansas Territory where he settled with a group of New England emigrants. By October of that year he had constructed a building and became editor of one of the first free-state newspapers in the territory, the Herald of Freedom, the organ of the New England Emigrant Aid Company. The newspaper angered the proslavery forces in the territory. On May 21, 1856, a proslavery posse led by the notorious Douglas County sheriff, Samuel J. Jones arrested Brown and sacked and burned Lawrence. Brown spent four months incarcerated following an indictment by a proslavery grand jury for high treason. Later his case was dismissed without trial for want of cause for prosecution. He returned to Lawrence to rebuild his business and resume the publication of the Herald of Freedom. In the capacity of editor he served until the last issue of the newspaper on December 17, 1859. Brown?s interests included the founding of the city of Emporia and oil. In 1860 Brown drilled three wells in Miami County and began to extract oil. He finally decided to leave Kansas in 1865 for the more lucrative oil fields of Pennsylvania. His stay in Pennsylvania was brief, however, and by the end of the year he had journeyed to Rockford, Illinois, where he decided to take up permanent residence. Brown died there on February 5, 1915, at the age of ninety-four.

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Alfred Gray

Leonard & Martin

A photograph of Alfred Gray, who was born in Evans, New York. In March 1857 Gray made the decision to immigrate to Kansas, where, at the age of 26, he settled in Quindaro, opening a law and real estate office. Soon, however, Gray chose to return to the occupation of his father, and he ultimately built one of the best farms in Wyandotte County. Gray was chief clerk of the territorial legislature and was elected to the first state legislature; in April 1862 he entered the army and served as a regimental quartermaster with the Fifth Kansas Cavalry and the 10th Kansas Infantry regiments. Gray is best known for his post-Civil War activities. He served as director of the State Agricultural Society from 1866 to 1870 and was elected secretary of the State Board of Agriculture in 1872, serving in this capacity until his death in 1880.

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William Marion Jardine

A photograph of William Marion Jardine who served as Secretary of Agriculture during the presidency of Calvin Coolidge. As one of the first Kansans to gain a cabinet level position at the national level, he was instrumental in directing a farm program that had become economically depressed during the post World War I period. Prior to his selection to this cabinet level position he had served as Dean of the School of Agriculture at Kansas State Agricultural College (Kansas State University) and subsequently became president of that institution from 1918 - 1925. Following his tenure as Secretary of Agriculture, President Hoover appointed Jardine as Ambassador to Egypt in 1930. Upon his return to this country in 1933, Gov. Alf Landon appointed him a temporary Kansas State Treasurer in the wake of the Finney Bond Scandal. Jardine resigned from that position in April 1934 and became the president of the University of Wichita (now Wichita State University).

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Steven A. Hawley

National Aeronautics and Space Administration

A photograph of Steven A. Hawley (far left) with astronauts (left to right) Charles F. Bolden, Jr., Kathryn D. Sullivan, Loren J. Shriver, and Bruce McCandless, II, posed near the Space Shuttle Discovery following a smooth landing at Edwards Air Force Base. The mission included launching the Hubble Space Telescope. Hawley was born in 1951 in Ottawa, Kansas, but grew up in Salina. After graduating from Salina High School, Hawley attended the University of Kansas where he graduated with honors in 1973 with degrees in physics and astronomy. He received a doctor of philosophy in astronomy and astrophysics from the University of California in 1977. Dr. Hawley was selected to join NASA's astronaut program in 1978.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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Samuel J. Reader

Reader, Samuel James, 1836-1914

This is a cabinet card showing Samuel J. Reader (1836-1914), who was born in Pennsylvania. He began a diary at the age of 13 and continued it until his death in 1914 at the age of 78. The diary--and the autobiography he wrote from it--describes his move to Kansas Territory in 1855, his claim near Topeka, his military experiences, farming, and his later service as Soldier Township trustee and school district clerk. He liberally illustrated his diary and recorded these events on canvas. His best known works are his drawings and paintings of territorial and Civil War experiences including the Battle of the Blue, which he is working on in this photograph. Although rather na´ve in style, Reader's illustrations provide a valuable record of early Kansas history, its social and political events.

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John R. Brinkley personal correspondence

Letters to and from John R. Brinkley, his wife, Minnie, and their son, Johnnie Boy. The letters are of a personal nature, covering such topics as the Brinkley's anniversary, their son's birthday, distance from one another, and John Sr.'s declining health.

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Tamping bar

Nels Ferguson, a Swedish immigrant, used this steel tamping bar in his work as a stonemason. He was involved in the construction of the Kansas Statehouse and the Topeka State Hospital. Ferguson later settled with his family in Richland Township in Jewell County, Kansas. He used his stonemason tools in the construction of his stone farmstead, Rock Hill Farm.

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