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Page 9 of 290, showing 10 records out of 2897 total, starting on record 81, ending on 90

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Martin Anderson

Brown's Photographic Gallery

This carte de visite shows Major Martin Anderson, (1817-1897), of Circleville, Kansas. A commander of Union forces during the Civil War Anderson joined the military ranks, on August 30, 1862, when he mustered into Company B of the 11th Kansas Volunteer Infantry Regiment as company captain. He rose through the military ranks to major, on November 22, 1863, after the regiment was reassigned as the 11th Kansas Volunteer Cavalry Regiment in the summer of 1863. Anderson served in this capacity until he mustered out, on September 18, 1865, at Fort Leavenworth. After the war he ran for political office, in 1866, and was elected the state treasurer of Kansas, (1867-1869). Anderson remained actively involved in community affairs until his passing, on July 9, 1897, at the age of eighty.

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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Camp Funston, Fort Riley, Kansas

Holt, O.W.

This panoramic view shows civilian workers awaiting their pay at Camp Funston. The facility located on the Ft. Riley military reservation, named after Brigadier General Frederick Funston, was one of sixteen divisional cantonment training camps built during World War I to house and train soldiers for military duty. Construction began in July of 1917 as approximately 15,000 carpenters built buildings in city block squares. The number of buildings estimated to have been built at the camp, were from 2,800 to 4,000 to accommodate the over 40,000 soldiers from the U.S. Army's 89th Division that were stationed at the facility. After the war, Camp Funston became a "mustering-out" center as soldiers prepared to return to civilian life. In 1924, the military decommissioned the 2,000 acre site with the dismantling of the buildings.

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Kansas Legislature, 1879

This sepia colored legislative panel shows members of the Kansas House of Representatives and the Senate. In the center of the panel, portraits of state officials have been inserted.

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Thomas Bayne Wilson

A photograph showing Thomas Bayne Wilson being sworn in as United States Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Transportation.

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Thomas Bayne Wilson

A photograph of Thomas Bayne Wilson seated at his desk. After reaching the rank of general, he left the military in 1944, returning to his civilian position as chairman of the board of TWA until 1947, then served one term in the Kansas House of Representatives from Jefferson County. After the 1948 session of the Kansas Legislature, he challenged incumbent U.S. Congressman Albert M. Cole (1st District) in the August Republican primary but lost. In 1950 he entered federal government service as regional director, Defense Materials Procurement Agency, with the rank of Minister (Diplomatic). In 1955, he became United States Deputy Under Secretary of Commerce for Transportation. Wilson later served on the Civil Aeronautics Board and was chairman of the board and director of Resort Airlines.

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John Wilbur Ripley

Kansas State Historical Society. Library and Archives Division

A photograph showing John Wilbur Ripley, a successful Topeka businessman and author, putting a lantern slide into a projector. His interests included photography, writing and early 20th century music, but his favorite pastime was collecting lantern slides, which are a colorful remnants from the end of the 19th century. A unique type of entertainment, also called illustrated song slides, were shown daily in the nation's 10,000 five-cent theatres or nickelodeons. It was a vocal act aided by a collection of hand-colored glass lantern slides, custom designed to illustrate the song's story line. Normally the slides were shown between films while the projectionist was changing the reels. Of the comparatively few accumulations of song slides that escaped destruction, the largest collection once belonged to John Ripley. Combining his interest in lantern slides and a flare for writing, John published several articles in American Heritage, Smithsonian, and a number of local publications.

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Frederic Remington

Frederic Remington took art classes as a freshman at Yale. He decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884 he married Eva Caten. Unhappy with Remington's cartoons at the time and his involvement in the saloon, she returned to New York. Alone amid failing businesses, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Frederick Lee Hall

Hetzel Photo Lab, Dodge City, Kansas

This black and white photograph shows Kansas Lieutenant Governor Fred Lee Hall (1916-1970), campaigning for governor in Dodge City, Kansas. Hall's platform was calling for reform to clean up Topeka, Kansas, similarly to President Eisenhower's efforts to clean up Washington, D. C. In the November general election he defeated his Democratic challenger George Docking to become the thirty-third governor of Kansas, serving from 1955 to 1957. Hall served one term as governor and was unsuccessful in his attempt for a second term. He resigned in the final days of his administration on January 11, 1957 accepting the appointment as justice of the Kansas Supreme Court from 1957 to 1958 before stepping down to run for the governor?s office again. After being unsuccessful, he retired from his political career.

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Frederic Remington

A photograph of Frederic Remington working in his studio. He took art classes as a freshman at Yale, and he decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884, he married Eva Caten. She became unhappy with Remington's cartoons and his involvement in the saloon so she left and returned to New York. Alone amid a failing business, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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