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Page 9 of 138, showing 10 records out of 1372 total, starting on record 81, ending on 90

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Mary Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ann Day , 1816-1884

This letter, written by Mary Brown from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, was addressed to her brother, William, who was studying at Phillip Exeter Academy in New Hampshire. Mary and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The main focus of the letter is the story of how Dr. John Doy was captured by Missourians while aiding twelve fugitive slaves. Mary was convinced that someone had told the Missourians about the plan of escape. She also mentioned her father's religious work, and "Old" John Brown's work to free Missouri slaves.

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Orville Chester Brown to Mr. Edwards

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

Orville C. Brown wrote this letter from Osawatomie to Mr. Edwards, regarding a shipment of school books. He also wrote concerning a common school in the area that would begin classes in May, taught by a Mr. Martin. Brown also mentioned, rather briefly, the needs of the Osawatomie community, including such skilled workers as blacksmiths and carpenters.

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Orville Chester Brown to Mr. Ward

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

This letter, written by Orville C. Brown from Osawatomie, was addressed to Mr. Ward. For the most part, it related information about the development of Osawatomie and various land claims, including a discussion about the boundaries of the town.

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Orville Chester Brown to Edward Allen

Brown, Orville Chester, 1811-1904

Orville C. Brown wrote from his home in Osawatomie to Edward Allen, describing the location of Osawatomie and the natural resources in the area. He also informed the recipient of the letter about the essential provisions to bring when emigrating to Kansas, as well as the current situation of free staters in Kansas.

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Sarah Brown to William Brown

Brown, Sarah

A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, by Sarah Brown, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was studying at Phillips Exeter Academy. Sarah and William were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Sarah writes of her position as a local schoolteacher. The final part of her letter describes how she and others heard cannon fire outside and later discovered it was part of a celebration of Carmi William Babcock's election as mayor.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written from Ashley, Massachusetts, by William Brown, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown. William and Sarah were the children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. William discussed his vacation from school at Phillips Exeter Academy. He expressed his anxiety about whether or not the Lecompton Constitution had been defeated, and worried that it may have succeeded due to presidential support for slavery.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William began by summarizing an editorial entitled ?A Military Quartette? that he said appeared in the Leavenworth Conservative newspaper the previous night. The editorial discussed the distinguished Civil War records of four partners of the Leavenworth law practice Ewing, Sherman, & McCook. William went on to discuss his position as a clerk at the state legislature and life in Topeka.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William R. Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William described his role as a soldier in the state militia during the Battle of the Blue and the Battle of Westport and rejoiced in the Union victories there. He also discussed the emotional state of the troops, of whom he says many were at first unwilling to fight and were a ?disgrace to Kansas.? William related news about the battles and the ultimate defeat of Sterling Price and the ?rebel? troops, who were forced to retreat south. William also mentioned riding a railroad line back to Lawrence.

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William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William Brown from Topeka, Kansas, was addressed to his sister, Sarah Brown, in Lawrence. William and Sarah were children of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. William discussed a Baptist church service in Topeka and the recent Kansas State Fair. The latter part of the letter discusses political issues, including recent elections and fear that the "bushwackers" may attack Leavenworth or Fort Scott.

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Myra McHenry

Buck, G.V.

Myra McHenry was a reformer who fought for anti-smoking laws as well as temperance and women's suffrage.

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