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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Adjutant General general correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This correspondence was sent and received by the Kansas Adjutant General's Office. Hiram T. Benam served as Adjutant General from 1876-1878 and Peter S. Noble served from 1878-1883. It includes inquiries made from men "anxious for organization" hoping to enlist militias in the towns of Parsons, Independence, Iuka, Lawrence, and Hutchinson. The collection also includes bill of ladings from the Kansas Pacific Railway and Rock Island (Illinois) Arsenal. Frequent correspondence was exchanged with Willis Brown, cashier for the State Bank of Kansas in Seneca, Kansas, Scott Hopkins of the Kansas University Cadets, John T. Bradley, a lawyer from Council Grove and member of the Kansas Senate from 1876 to 1880, F.C. Merrill, a lumber dealer from Paola, and E.D. Rose, a hardware dealer from Holton.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Muster Roll, Kansas Volunteers for the Protection of the Ballot Box, Wyandotte County

The Kansas Volunteers for the Protection of the Ballot Box were free state supporters who were determined to see that fair elections were held in Kansas Territory. James Lane was appointed to organize companies throughout the territory. General Order No. 1 (which may be found on this web site), included instructions for listing the members of each company, and this muster roll was prepared as a result of that order. The muster roll for Captain A. H. Macauley's company identified the officers and enlisted men, their age, birthplace, place from which they came to Kansas, and their Kansas residence. A "Remarks" column was used to record the type of weapon the individual was either issued or brought with him: e.g., Sharps, western rifle, and carbine. [All the men listed appear to be residents of Quindaro, Wyandotte County in their twenties or early thirties.]

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History of the 19th Kansas Cavalry--Indian War of 1868-69

Jenness, George B.

This history of the 19th Kansas, written by the commander of Company F, George B. Jenness, is mainly composed of extracts from his diary. It includes details about where each company was raised, the names of the officers, organization and implementation of orders, the rigors of army life, and troop movements. Jenness' history also includes information about Samuel J. Crawford, the governor of Kansas, who resigned his position to assume command of the regiment on November 5, 1868. The document contains a copy of a letter from General Philip H. Sheridan to Governor Crawford about the need for calling up troops. Information on Native Americans, including interactions between troops and Native Americans, is also contained within this item. Jenness mentions captive chief including Satanta.

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Charles Robinson to Eli Thayer

Robinson, Charles, 1818-1894

Charles Robinson, writing from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Eli Thayer in Worcester, Massachusetts, described voting irregularities in the March 30, 1855 election of members to the territorial legislature. Robinson maintained that the election was "controlled entirely by Missourians" who came to the territory, took over the polling places, and cast illegal ballots to ensure that proslavery supporters were elected to the legislature. Robinson also reported that free staters in Lawrence had formed themselves into four military companies, and urged Thayer to send Sharps rifles and cannons for these forces.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel N. Simpson wrote to Hiram Hill from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, updating him on the status of Hill's rents and outlining the rental agreements he had arranged with the various tenants. Simpson mentioned he had raised the $5000 for the church, as promised, and that Hill's money could not be invested in Wyandotte lands until they were properly surveyed. He added that he had recently brought firearms to Kansas Territory, stating " I think our trouble in Kansas has only begun -- but let the war and even dissolution come -- the quicker the better."

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John Doy and rescue party

DaLee, Amon Gilbert

On January 25, 1859, free state activists Dr. John Doy and his son, Charles, left Lawrence, Kansas Territory, for Nebraska with 13 slaves. They were captured when only twelve miles out of Lawrence, and were taken to Weston, Missouri. The two Doys had an examination at Weston and were committed to jail at Platte City, Missouri, for the crime of abducting slaves. They remained in jail until March 20, 1859, then moved to St. Joseph, Missouri, where Dr. Doy was tried. After the trial, Charles Doy was set free. However, the first jury could not agree on a verdict for Dr. Doy, and he was tried a second time. At the second trial, he was convicted and sentenced to five years in the penitentiary. While being held in the St. Joseph jail, he was freed by friends from Kansas Territory on July 23, 1859. People in the ambrotype are: (l to r) Major James B. Abbott, Captain Joshua A. Pike, Jacob Senix, Joseph Gardner, Thomas Simmons, S. J. Willis, Captain John E. Stuart [Stewart], Charles Doy, Silas Soule, George R. Hay, and Dr. John Doy (seated in front). The ambrotype was taken at Lawrence, Kansas Territory, in the summer of 1859.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday of Meadville, Pennsylvania reported the contents of a letter her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, had received from William D. Paul of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Cyrus was speaking in New Castle, PA on the behalf of Republican presidential candidate John C. Fremont. Paul wrote that Harry G. Young was living in Cyrus' Topeka house. Milton C. Dickey and Dr. George A. Cutler had returned to Topeka without weapons, to the disappointment of the "Topeka boys," who anticipated conflict with Missourians. Mary recommended reading the New York Times. She wrote of her dissatisfaction with their separation and readiness to emigrate to Kansas Territory.

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Reminiscence of the 1893 legislative war

Bull, Floyd R.

In this reminiscence, Floyd R. Bull, a member of the El Dorado company of the Kansas National Guard, recalls his involvment in the Legislative (or Populist) War of 1893. During this conflict, violence broke out between the competing legislative houses--the Republican (Douglass) House and the Populist (Dunsmore) House--prompting Populist Governor Lorenzo Lewelling to call the National Guard to the capitol. On February 25 the Kansas Supreme Court affirmed the validity of the Republican House, thus ending the "war." This reminiscence is a copy of an earlier statement by Bull, written in 1938.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

St. Louis attorneys Knox & Kellogg responded to an inquiry from James Abbott, informing him that they had been in communication with M. F. Conway, by request of Samuel Cabot. Knox & Kellogg told Abbott that, once received, they would hold the rifles subject to Cabot's order. The attorneys stated they had done all they could since they had not heard further word from Cabot nor could they predict when they themselves would receive the rifle shipment. Cabot had made several attempts to recover rifles that were stolen from him by Missouri "Highwaymen" in the spring of 1857.

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