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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Franklin George Adams' Residence, Topeka, Kansas

A sepia colored photo of Franklin George Adams' residence on the S.W. corner of Fifteenth and Mulvane streets in Topeka, Kansas. F. G. Adams, one of Kansas' most prominent settlers, was a free-stater and member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of 1858. In 1862, he drafted the law providing for the organization of the state's agriculture society and served for three years as the society's secretary. In addition to his appointment as agriculture secretary, Adams was Clerk of the United States District Court from 1863 to 1864. Following this position, Adams was appointed United States Indian Agent to the Kickappos from 1865 to 1869. Adams' greatest and lasting contribution as a public servant was his appointment, in 1875, as secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. During his tenure as secretary, Adams dedicated his time and effort to build the society's collection of original documents for future generations to study and interpret the state's history.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Ewing, Thomas, 1829-1896

Thomas Ewing, Jr., wrote from Leavenworth to his father in Ohio seeking his assistance with a legal matter involving claims to the land "reserved to certain half breeds of the Kansas tribe." Most of this land was occupied by squatters and questions of legal title and transfer were being litigated in the territorial and federal courts.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chadwick wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, regarding the land dispute between Hill and Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. Chadwick had been advised by Robert Lawrence (perhaps a local attorney) to correspond with a Nathaniel Pope Causin, Prosecutor of Indian Claims, in Washington. Chadwick, for Lawrence's support and assistance, had advised that Hill would pay him. Chadwick was to pass along Causin's card once he received it from Mr. Lawrence.

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Richard M. Young to A. Beach

Young, Richard M

Written on stationery from Young & Niles, Law and Land Agency at Washington City, D. C., this letter to A. [Asahel?] Beach of "Beach Valley," Rice County, Kansas Territory, discussed the inquiry the law firm made "as to the proper mode of proceeding to recover damages for Indian Depredations . . . ." The attorney explained the statute of June 30, 1834, that covered this process and its provisions. Since Young referred Beach to the agents of the Kaws and the Kiowas (or "Indians of the upper Arkansas"), one might assume that his damage claim was connected to one of the raids by the latter tribe against the former.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chawick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, to tell him that it appeared favorable that Hill would win possession of the land disputed by Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. However, Chadwick feared that the decision may not be made as easily as he had earlier anticipated, since Robert Lawrence had been seen in Leavenworth and had not traveled to Washington to work with Nathaniel Causin. Nonetheless, Abelard Guthrie had given up trying to obtain the land as well, leaving Hiram as the only other claimant.

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Nathaniel Pope Causin to Hiram Hill

Causin, Nathanial Pope

Nathaniel Pope Causin wrote from Washington to Hiram Hill in Williamsburgh, Massachusetts. Causin had received word from Robert Lawrence and Charles Chadwick of the Territorial Kansas land claim dispute between Hill and Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. Causin confirmed he would represent Hill in Hill's lawsuit to maintain ownership of his claim. Causin awaited Robert Lawrence's arrival in Washington in order to proceed aggressively, but would continue making necessary contacts.

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Thomas Ewing, Jr., to Thomas Ewing, Sr.

Writing to his father from Leavenworth, K.T., Thomas Ewing, Jr., described the prospects for "good bargains" in Delaware lands. "Hamp" went to secure 1,000 acres for Ewing, Sr., which they hoped to acquire for $3.00 per acre. Ewing, Jr., addressed additional transactions that he was considering for his father and others.

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William Weer, Brief for Applicant

Weer, William

William Weer served as legal counsel for the Wyandotte Reserve and presented this brief on behalf of William Lykins and Robert Robitaille apparently to the Commissioner of the Land Office at Lecompton, Kansas Territory. Lykins and Robitaille were attempting to receive a patent for land that was also claimed by the Lawrence Association, Gaius Jenkins, Charles Robinson, S. J. Livingston, George G. Mathews, and William Savage. The brief contained a short history of the Wyandot tribes removal west and various treaties involving land. The claim involved parts of the city of Lawrence. The brief cited various cases and laws upon which Mr. Weer based his arguments.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, primarily Rev. W. L. Dexter, secretary, Robert Norris, secretary, Julian K. Codding, lawyer, and William T. Jones, solicitor. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, Rev. Charles W. Whorrall, and William H. McCamish, assistant attorney general of Wyandotte County. Included in this correspondence are several signed petitions to members of the U.S. Senate from citizens in Arkansas City, Kirwin, and Abilene asking them to vote against the Hamilton Bill which they argue "would annul the solemn pledge of the Government to protect the Indians against the introduction and sale of intoxicants in the Indian territory." Some financial records are also included, such as a report from the finance committee for the previous year, ending February 15, 1905, and receipts and disbursements by month, signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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