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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 14 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Letter, Charles H. Branscomb to Rev. Edward E. Hale

Branscomb, Charles H.

Charles Branscomb wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Branscomb informed Hale that he had advanced money Francis Serenbetz and his party of thirty German emigrants to assist them in their effort to establish a colony on the Neosho River. Branscomb indicated that there had been considerable confusion about whether the New England Emigrant Aid Company had agreed to provide the Serenbetz party with funds, but he felt it best to provide the money.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute observed that Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister, and his party of thirty German immigrants were in Lawrence and getting ready to head south to establish a colony on the Neosho River that they planned to name Humboldt. Nute was not optimistic that the Serenbetz party would succeed due to their lack of financial resources. Nute commented that immigration into Kansas continued to increase and estimated that nearly 1,000 people per day entered the territory. He stated that most of the new immigrants were from Western states and "of the right kind to stay." Nute also commented on the lack of saw and grist mills in the territory and blamed the New England Emigrant Aid Company for the deficiency.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute described efforts to establish a high school in Lawrence as well as a university in Kansas Territory. He also advised Hale to pay close attention to the activities of Francis Serenbetz, a German Congregational minister who was the leader of a group of German immigrants who settled in Humboldt, Kansas Territory. In Nute's opinion, Serenbetz was an "unmitigated humbug and nuisance" who came to Kansas for self-interested reasons. Nute urged Hale to stop sending settlers to Kansas who lacked financial resources or a willingness to work to support themselves.

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New Scandinavia settlers to Governor Nehemiah Green

New Scandinavia (Republic County) Settlers

Settlers of the New Scandinavia settlement, Kansas, petition Governor Nehemiah Green of Topeka for protection from possible Indian depredations. The petitioners request a company of fifty soldiers to protect the settlement. Several hundred additional settlers were expected the following Spring. The petitioners are concerned that reports of Indian depredations may keep additional settlers away. John Breaton served as immigration agent for the colony. The Scandinavian Agricultural Society founded New Scandinavia in 1867 and the town reincorporated as Scandia in 1879. The advancing line of white settlement continued to aggravate relations with Indians of the region. Peace treaties, like the meeting at present Medicine Lodge (Barber County) in October of 1867, demonstrated that polite negotiations were possible but failed to resolve the conflicts.

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Hall of Irish American Protections Club to Governor John Martin

Irish American Protection Club

In this resolution, the Irish American Protections Club in Atchison, Kansas, thanks Kansas Governor John Martin for his effort in ending a railroad strike. The resolution notes that "It is the first time in the history of strikes that a Governor was found on the side of labor?"

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Robert Heike to Arthur Capper

Heike, Robert J.

This letter from Robert Heike, Jr., pastor of the Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lydia, Kansas, to Kansas Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, addresses the use of the German language during church services. Heike explains that the local War Committee has asked that church services conducted in German be stopped, and he would like to know if a federal law exists prohibiting services in languages other than English.

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A. J. Dyck to Arthur Capper

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

Reverend A. J. Dyck of the Hoffnungsau Mennonite Church, Inman, Kansas, wrote this letter to Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, Kansas, concerning the Third Liberty Loan drive and its impact on the German American community. Dyck explains that the members of his church have bought more than the amount of Liberty Loans required by the established quota in order to prove their loyalty and avoid harassment by "mobs." In addition, Dyck asks Capper if it would be acceptable for members of his church to donate to the Red Cross rather than providing money to support the war effort.

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Lutheran Church protests correspondence

Kansas. Governor (1915-1919: Capper)

This correspondence is the result of, and in reaction to, accusations that Lutheran Churches in the U.S. were loyal to the Kaiser (German Emperor) because most of their congregation consists of German Americans. In one piece of the correspondence, Pastor W.T.Vogel of Humboldt, Kansas, writes to Governor Arthur Capper of Topeka, and requests that Capper pass his letter and accompanying newspaper clipping to the Topeka newspapers for distribution. Governor Capper responds by assuring Vogel that he does not doubt the loyalty of members of the Lutheran Church.

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John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902

This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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C.B. Schmidt to Colonel A.S. Johnson

Schmidt, C. B.

This letter is from C.B. Schmidt, foreign agent for the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railroad to Colonel A.S. Johnson, Acting Land Commission for the Santa Fe Railroad. Schmidt writes about the prospect of foreign immigration coming to the United States in the near future, mostly focusing on the number of Mennonites and other Russo-Germans expected to immigrate. Page 7 of the letter contains a statement of land sales to "Foreigners from the U.S. and Canada" and "Foreigners from Europe Direct. It covers the time period February 15, 1873, through May 30, 1877. Sales are grouped by Germans, Austrians, Scandinavians, French, Russo-Germans, Dutch, and Swiss. It shows the number of acres and the amount of income by group.

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