Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Type of Material -- Unpublished documents (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Thematic Time Period -- Civil War, 1861 - 1865 (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 30 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Andrew Jackson Huntoon correspondence

Huntoon, Andrew Jackson, d. 1902

Andrew Jackson Huntoon was a physician who came to Kansas in 1857, settling south of Topeka in Williamsport, Shawnee County. In 1861 he enlisted with the 5th Kansas Cavalry volunteer regiment, serving as assistant surgeon and surgeon of that group, seeing service along the Missouri border and in Arkansas. After mustering out he settled in Topeka, where he died in 1902. This collection consists primarily of letters to or from Lizzie, Huntoon's friend and later wife. Some of the content describes Indian affairs and military matters. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

previewthumb

Samuel Reader's diary, volume 6

Reader, Samuel James, 1836-1914

This volume of Samuel Reader's diary covers April 1864-July 1869. Reader also referred to this work as his private journal and day book. Reader lived in Indianola, Kansas, in Shawnee County. In addition to English, Reader writes the diary in French and in shorthand.

previewthumb

James Blood correspondence

James Blood was involved with the first party of New England Emigrant Aid Company settlers who arrived to Kansas in late July 1854. Blood was actively engaged from the beginning in the free-state movement. He served as treasurer of the Kansas State Central Committee, 1856-1857, as a member of the Topeka legislature, 1856, as the first mayor of Lawrence in 1857, as a member of the central territorial committee at the Republican Party's organizing convention in May 1859, as county treasurer in the early 1860s, and as a representative from Lawrence in the 1869 state legislature. He died in Lawrence on February 4, 1891. This folder of correspondence focuses on the years 1854 to 1861, with some letters discussing border problems with Missouri and the need for additional troops and artillery.

previewthumb

William Brown to Sarah Brown

Brown, William

This letter, written by William R. Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, was addressed to his sister Sarah Brown, who was away at a teaching position in Massachusetts. William described his role as a soldier in the state militia during the Battle of the Blue and the Battle of Westport and rejoiced in the Union victories there. He also discussed the emotional state of the troops, of whom he says many were at first unwilling to fight and were a ?disgrace to Kansas.? William related news about the battles and the ultimate defeat of Sterling Price and the ?rebel? troops, who were forced to retreat south. William also mentioned riding a railroad line back to Lawrence.

previewthumb

J. Heath to John Stillman Brown

Heath, J.

A letter written by J. Heath from Paola, Kansas, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Brown had apparently asked Heath for assistance in helping him become an Army chaplain, but Heath's letter informed him that the request was made too late. Heath also discusses camp life in Paola.

previewthumb

Leigh R. Webber to Charles Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to Charles Brown. Webber expresses frustration at his bad health, the poor weather, and fort life. He wished for the troops to move to territory where they could engage in battle and gain "military glory." Webber describes the unruly behavior of the troops, including violence and drunkenness.

previewthumb

Leigh R. Webber to Esteemed Friend

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from Trenton, Tennessee, likely addressed to a member of the John Stillman Brown family. Webber describes a "jayhawking trip" his regiment took to take goods and food from a local Confederate family. He discusses the treatment of slaves and escaped slaves, both by Confederate locals and his fellow Union troops. A portion of the letter states Webber's opinions on James H. Lane's efforts to arm African-American troops in Kansas.

previewthumb

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Chandler, Daniel L.

This letter was written by Daniel L. Chandler from Paola, Kansas, to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. The first portion of Chandler's letter describes a young soldier named James, apparently recuperating from illness and under Brown's care and supervision in Lawrence. Chandler speaks of promotions and new officers in the army and his contentment with his "humble position" as hospital steward. He also writes of his popularity with the troops and his efforts to obtain "comforts" for them.

previewthumb

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Chandler, Daniel L.

A letter written by Daniel L. Chandler from three locations (West Point, Bates County, Missouri; Mapleton, Missouri; and Kansas City, Missouri) on three separate dates, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Chandler describes in detail his experiences caring for sick and wounded soldiers. He expresses great emotion at the destruction and carnage he's witnessed in Missouri. Chandler also discusses the "humanity" of the army hospital surgeons, whose greatest priority is "the health of the soldier."

previewthumb

Daniel L. Chandler to John Stillman Brown

Chandler, Daniel L.

A letter written by Daniel L. Chandler from Fort Scott, Kansas, addressed to John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence. Chandler describes conditions at the fort, including supplies and food rations. He also discusses his role in caring for sick soldiers.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3|