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Page 1 of 10, showing 10 records out of 93 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Alexander Martin, governor of Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the tenth Governor of Kansas John Alexander Martin on the steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas with state office employees.

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Solomon Miller

A photograph of Solomon Miller, who was born in Lafayette, Indiana, in 1831 and raised in Prable County, Ohio. Solomon Miller came to Kansas Territory and founded the Kansas Chief newspaper at White Cloud in 1857. In 1872 Miller moved the Chief to Troy, Kansas. Miller served in both the Kansas House and Senate. He lived and worked in Troy until his death in 1897.

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Kansas Adjutant General miscellaneous correspondence

Kansas. Adjutant General's Office

This is correspondence received by Kansas Adjutant General Alexander B. Campbell. Frequent correspondents include S.L. Patrick, M.C. Reville, J.F. Morrison, P.W. Kreskey, C.T. Kelton, and Ben L. Henderson, among others. Many of these men were members of the Kansas National Guard who were employed as lawyers, some specializing in military pension claims.

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Emma Ellis, Rossville, Kansas

A photograph of Emma Ellis. Emma was elected Rossville, Kansas, treasurer in 1889 on an all-woman ticket. This photograph is provided through a pilot project to host unique cultural heritage materials from local libraries on Kansas Memory and was accomplished by mutual agreement between the Northeast Kansas Library System, the Rossville Community Library, and the Kansas Historical Society.

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Williard Davis

Mullen

This cabinet card shows Willard Davis, who served as Kansas' 10th Attorney General from January 8, 1877 to January 10, 1881. He was born January 26, 1837 in Madison County, Kentucky. He attended Missouri University, then studied law at Lexington, Kentucky, and was admitted to practice there. When the war began, he was commissioned into the Union army as a Lieutenant in the Thirty-First Kentucky Volunteer Infantry, but his military career was brief due to failing health. On March 14, 1863, Davis was appointed by President Abraham Lincoln as the Internal Revenue Collector for Kentucky. He held the position until September 1, 1866 when he was dismissed for failure to accept President Andrew Johnson's policies. Davis resumed his law career and advocated for civil rights for freed slaves. In the fall of 1870, Davis moved to Neosho Falls, Kansas and became the attorney for the Missouri, Kansas and Texas Railway Company. The following year he settled in Parsons, Kansas and was elected the town's first mayor. To focus on his political career, he resigned from the railroad in 1873. In 1874, he was elected county attorney for Labette County, Kansas. He held this office until he was elected in 1876 to serve as Attorney General for the State of Kansas. After two terms he returned to his private law practice. On December 6, 1885 at the age of forty-eight, he passed away after a lengthy illness at his home at Eleventh and Van Buren Street in Topeka, Kansas.

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Historic Psychiatry original miscellaneous documents

These are a variety of handwritten and typed letters, lectures, autographs, news clippings, biographical information, images and sketches, court documents, and other documents related to the history of psychiatry. These documents are housed in four boxes and the folders within are arranged alphabetically by surname or title, and they are included in the larger collection of historic psychiatry material in the Menninger Archives. Authors come from such fields as medicine, religion, prison and other reform and advocacy movements, politics, the military, etc. The documents themselves sometimes provide significant information, and sometimes they were collected because their authors were significant historical figures. Some of the individuals found in Box 1 include James Mark Baldwin, Ludwig Binswanger, Eugen Bleuler, Jean-Martin Charcot, Elizabeth Fry, Oliver Wendell Holmes, and Carl Jung. Some of the individuals found in Box 2 include Alfred Adler, Robert Frost, and Washinton Irving. This box also includes a 68-page handwritten notebook by Dr. W.W. Reed entitled "Reminiscenses About the Treatment of the Insane." Some of the individuals found in Box 3 include Amariah Brigham and Frederick van Eeden. This box also includes a correspondence file (1883-1888) on Ellen Kehoe, a patient at the Worcester Lunatic Hospital in Massachusetts, and a series of drawings from the 1920s and 1930s by a Belgian patient suffering from paranoia named Andreas at the Kankakee State Hospital in Illinois. The drawings were donated by Dr. J.B. Gier, formerly of the Topeka Veteran's Administration Hospital, who knew the patient and encouraged his work. Box 4 includes a miscellaneous folder regarding insane asylums and contains legal documents, postcard images, and receipts for services. Languages include English, German, French and Italian, and transcriptions or translations follow some of the documents.

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Richard West to John P. St. John

Richard West, a resident of Barton Station, Alabama, wrote this letter to Kansas governor St. John requesting information about available land in Kansas. West was a farmer who described in some detail many of the concerns facing emigrants, including transportation and other expenses. In addition to his role as governor of Kansas, St. John also served on the Board of Directors of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Fremont Leidy

Kuhns, O. D.

A portrait of Fremont Leidy, the son of Abram and Martha Leidy. He grew up on the family farm in Butler County, Kansas, attended high schools in Augusta and El Dorado, and graduated from Fort Scott Normal School in 1887. After graduation he accepted a position as principal at Severy Schools and two years later the superintendency of the Augusta schools. Three years later he entered law school at Kansas University and was admitted to practice in 1893. He opened an office at El Dorado where he practiced a short time. Health issues forced him to leave his law practice and he started a farm. In 1900 he was elected to the Kansas Senate, representing District 25 in Butler County and served for two years. Governor Stanley selected him as a member of the text-book commission. In 1908 he was reelected to the senate. On June 27, 1910, Leidy was appointed United State revenue collector for Kansas. He married Myrtle Jenkins on July, 1893 and they had three children: Pauline, Richard J., and Roger. Myrtle died on July 22, 1906 and he married A. Zota Martin on September 9, 1914.

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John Morton

This is a photograph of an oil painting of John Morton, Clerk of the U. S. District Court of Kansas and District Court Judge for Shawnee County, Topeka, Kansas.

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Testimony of A. A. Harris, in report and testimony of the select committee to investigate the causes of the removal of the Negroes from the southern states to the northern states, in three parts

United States. Congress. Senate. Select Committee on Negro Exodus

A. A. Harris, a white resident of Ft. Scott, Kansas, gave this brief testimony on March 29, 1880, before the Senate select committee investigating the causes of the Exodus. Harris described his contact with the black Exodusters in his area, including their difficulty finding employment. The committee also asked Harris to speak in some detail about the general treatment of African-Americans in Kansas, including any discrimination against them, particularly in the world of politics. This committee was composed of three Democratic senators and two Republican senators: Daniel W. Voorhees (Dem., Indiana), Zebulon B. Vance (Dem., North Carolina), George H. Pendleton (Dem., Ohio), William Windom (Rep., Minnesota), and Henry W. Blair (Rep., New Hampshire). Senators Blair and Vance asked the questions presented in this testimony.

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