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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 13 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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John Palmer Usher

Corwin, E.H.

This cabinet card represents John Palmer Usher,1816-1889, a lawyer from Indiana, who servers as U. S. Secretary of the Interior during President Abraham Lincoln's administration. Usher serves only two years, 1863-1865, before returning to private life. In 1865, he becomes the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad; a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher, also, resumes his political career, when he moves to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and is elected to one term as the town's mayor,1879 -1881. On April 13, 1889, at the age of seventy-three, Usher passes away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. He is buried at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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John Palmer Usher

This photograph shows John Palmer Usher,1816-1889, a lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher servers only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior,1863-1865, before returning to private life. In 1865, he becomes the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he holds until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumes his political career when he moves to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and is elected to serve one term as the town's mayor, 1879 to 1881. On April 13, 1889, at the age of seventy-three, he passes away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial is at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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Cyrus Leland, Jr.

Troxell & Brother

This is a portrait of Cyrus Leland, Jr., (1841-1917), in his military uniform. He was born in Sauk County, Wisconsin, and came to Kansas in 1858. He served as a lieutenant with Company F of the Tenth Kansas Infantry. He was a member of the Kansas legislature in 1865-1866 and again in 1903-1907. Beginning in 1866, he operated a store in Troy, Kansas, and served many years as county commissioner and as a member of the Republican national committee. Appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to be collector of internal revenue for Kansas, Oklahoma and the Indian Territory, 1889-1893, he was named Missouri Valley pension agent by President William McKinley, a position he held from 1897 until 1901. Leland was a dominant force in Kansas politics and government at both the state and national levels. He died in a St. Joseph, Missouri, hospital.

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Cyrus Leland, Jr.

This is a tintype of Cyrus Leland, Jr., wearing his military uniform. Leland, born in 1841 in Sauk County, Wisconsin, came to Kansas in 1858. He served as a lieutenant with Company F of the Tenth Kansas Infantry. He was a member of the Kansas legislature from 1865-66 and again from 1903-1907. Beginning in 1866, he operated a store in Troy, Kansas, and served many years as county commissioner and as a member of the Republican national committee. Appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to be collector of internal revenue for Kansas, Oklahoma and the Indian Territory, 1889-1893, Leland was named Missouri Valley pension agent by President William McKinley, a position he held from 1897 until 1901. Leland died in 1917 at a St. Joseph, Missouri, hospital.

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Cyrus Leland, Jr.

This is a tintype of Cyrus Leland, Jr., wearing his military uniform. Leland, born in 1841 in Sauk County, Wisconsin, came to Kansas in 1858. He served as a lieutenant with Company F of the Tenth Kansas Infantry. He was a member of the Kansas legislature from 1865-66 and again from 1903-1907. Beginning in 1866, he operated a store in Troy, Kansas, and served many years as county commissioner and as a member of the Republican national committee. Appointed by President Benjamin Harrison to be collector of internal revenue for Kansas, Oklahoma and the Indian Territory, 1889-1893, Leland was named Missouri Valley pension agent by President William McKinley, a position he held from 1897 until 1901. Leland died in 1917 at a St. Joseph, Missouri, hospital.

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Daniel Read Anthony

This carte de visite shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory, in 1854, as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but successfully led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.

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Daniel Read Anthony

This engraving shows Daniel Read Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successful career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business and enlisted in the U.S. army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry, later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, his military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth.

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Daniel Read Anthony

Dudensing, R.

This engraving shows Daniel Read, Anthony, (1824-1904), brother of suffragist Susan B. Anthony. He migrated to the Kansas territory in 1854 as a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company and later settled in Leavenworth, Kansas; where he established a long and successfully career as a newspaper editor and publisher. Anthony owned and operated the Leavenworth Conservative, the Bulletin, and later, in 1871, the Leavenworth Times. With the outbreak of the Civil War he left the newspaper business to enlist in the Union army as a lieutenant colonel of the First Kansas Cavalry later reassigned as the Seventh Kansas Regiment. Anthony was involved in several skirmishes and battles during the Civil War but led troops to victory at the Battle of the Little Blue. In 1862, Anthony's military career was marked with controversy for not following orders issued under General Robert Mitchell's command. On September 3, 1862, he resigned from his post and returned to Leavenworth, Kansas. Anthony became actively involved in the community serving several terms on the city council and two terms as mayor of Leavenworth. He was also elected, in 1868, President of the Republican State Convention and served as President of the Kansas Historical Society from 1885 to 1886. For nearly a century Anthony was associated with the issues and concerns of Leavenworth, Kansas. On November 12, 1904, he passed away at the age of eighty in Leavenworth, Kansas.

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