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Agriculture -- Crops (Remove)
Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 16 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hunter, James M.

James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.

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Thomas Nesbit Stinson and Edward Hoogland, tenant agreement

Stinson, Thomas N. (Thomas Nesbit), 1818-1882

Agreement in which Thomas N. Stinson agreed to rent twenty acres of land to Edward Hoogland in exchange for one-third of the crops produced on the land.

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Ke Kahn [Joseph Napolean Bourassa] to Ne Kahn [Thomas Nesbit Stinson]

Bourassa, Joseph Napolean, 1810-1878

Joseph N. Bourassa, a Pottawatomie Indian who signed this letter with his Indian name of Ke Kahn, wrote to Thomas N. Stinson, a Tecumseh resident and Indian trader who had been adopted by the Shawnee tribe and given the Indian name of Ne Kahn. Bourassa, an interpreter for the Pottawatomie Agency, described difficulties in finding laborers to cut the hay that he had promised to provide to Stinson.

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Samuel Clarke Pomeroy to Thaddeus Hyatt

Pomeroy, S. C. (Samuel Clarke), 1816-1891

In this letter, S. C. Pomeroy wrote from Atchison, Kansas to Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. The letter revolved around the suffering of the settlers and their desperate search for provisions and employment. Pomeroy also mentioned the prospect of obtaining a large amount of buffalo meat, as well as the failed corn crop and the generally destitute condition of the settlers. He truly feared for the lives of the settlers during the upcoming winter.

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S.H. Moore, reminiscences

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

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S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

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James H. Holmes, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony of James Holmes is a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal stories recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. Mr. Holmes had studied agricultural chemistry before entering Kansas Territory, and his initial reason for emigrating was his desire to undertake agricultural experiments. He had also intended to join with Clubbs Vegetarian Settlement, which was located on the Neosho River near the north line of the Osage Reserve. He goes into detail about the Neosho valley and its vegetation, mineral deposits, etc. The rest of his account deals with his involvement in the free state militia and his role in defending Osawatomie.

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William Beh, testimony

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony, presumably from the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was most likely recorded on paper by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular testimony is a very brief account of William Beh's experiences during the turbulent times of 1856 and 1857. It includes information about his claim on the south fork of Pottawatomie Creek and his involvement in the militia as a member of Capt. Samuel Anderson's company. He also requests aid, because he has been sick for three or four months.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote letters from several cities to his wife, Mary Holliday, after leaving their home at Meadville, Pennsylvania to return to business at Topeka, Kansas Territory. Once in Lawrence, K. T., he reported the political situation to his wife. Governor Andrew H. Reeder, who expected violence, and the fraudulently elected Territorial Legislature were at loggerheads. (Holliday had been elected to the Legislature in a reelection called by Governor Reeder during Holliday's absence, but the reelection results were rejected by the Legislature). Holliday also mentioned the good corn crop and warm weather and expressed his love for his wife and daughter, Lillie, born March 18.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

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