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Page 1 of 1, showing 8 records out of 8 total, starting on record 1, ending on 8

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

W.T. Sherman to Robert Campbell

Sherman, William T. (William Tecumseh), 1820-1891

A letter to Robert Campbell regarding the debt that Sherman, Ewing & McCook were trying to collect. As with similar correspondence, this letter conveys a sense of the legal and financial transactions that played a major part in the firm's business activities in the territory.

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Jonathan Crews to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Crews, Jonathan

Jonathan Crews, writing from LaPorte, Indiana, expressed strong proslavery views on the situation in Kansas. Crews described his trip home to Indiana from Kansas and discussed several Indiana court cases involving his business interests.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

The biggest share of this 8-page letter is devoted to comments on the weather and the environment, in and around Atchison, where Ingalls now had a law practice (for a time, he continued to live in Sumner). He missed some aspects of "Massachusetts weather," but overall he thought Kansas superior: "I have not had a cold in six months and but one or two since I came here . . . [and] The attacks of melancholy and despondency to which I was once a prey have also almost entirely disappeared." Ingalls also wrote of two arson fires--"a large grocery house" and "the steamer Hesperian," and the expected fate of the suspect then in custody.

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Charles Chadwick to Hiram Hill

Chadwick, Charles

Charles Chawick wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, to tell him that it appeared favorable that Hill would win possession of the land disputed by Robert Robetaille, a Wyandot Indian. However, Chadwick feared that the decision may not be made as easily as he had earlier anticipated, since Robert Lawrence had been seen in Leavenworth and had not traveled to Washington to work with Nathaniel Causin. Nonetheless, Abelard Guthrie had given up trying to obtain the land as well, leaving Hiram as the only other claimant.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

Attorneys Knox & Kellogg wrote from St. Louis to James Abbott in Lawrence, Kansas Territory, responding to a lawsuit brought against them by Samuel Cabot. Cabot held them responsible for the long delay in returning several rifles that had been stolen from him the previous spring by Missouri "Highwaymen." Knox and Kellogg reported to Abbott, acting as agent for Cabot, that the lawsuit had been dismissed and the damage to the rifles was to be appraised by a third party.

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Knox & Kellogg to James B. Abbott

St. Louis attorneys Knox & Kellogg responded to an inquiry from James Abbott, informing him that they had been in communication with M. F. Conway, by request of Samuel Cabot. Knox & Kellogg told Abbott that, once received, they would hold the rifles subject to Cabot's order. The attorneys stated they had done all they could since they had not heard further word from Cabot nor could they predict when they themselves would receive the rifle shipment. Cabot had made several attempts to recover rifles that were stolen from him by Missouri "Highwaymen" in the spring of 1857.

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Wilson Shannon to John A. Halderman

Shannon, Wilson, 1802-1877

Wilson Shannon was an Ohio Democrat who preceded John W. Geary as governor of Kansas Territory (August 1856--August 1857) and was considered a proslave partisan. Shanon writes John Halderman from Lecompton, Kansas Territory, regarding some legal matters--specifically, "some land warrants" being sent to Halderman in Leavenworth. Attorney John Halderman was trusted and respected by men on both the anti- and pro-slavery sides.

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