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Page 1 of 52, showing 10 records out of 513 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Allen White

Portrait of William Allen white, editor and owner of the Emporia Gazette newspaper, Emporia, Kansas.

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William Inge

A portrait of playwright William Motter Inge, 1913-1973. Born in Independence, Kansas, Inge graduated from the University of Kansas, worked for a Wichita radio station, and taught in both high school and college. His play "Come Back, Little Sheba" brought him fame in 1949. In 1953, the play "Picnic" won a Pulitzer Prize and in 1955, "Bus Stop" received rave reviews. Inge drew upon his Kansas background for the characters and storylines in his plays.

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Col. O.W. Wheeler's cattle herd

Baker-Co

View of Col. O. W. Wheeler's herd en route to the Kansas Pacific Railway in 1867. The illustration was copied from "Historic Sketches of the Cattle Trade" by Joseph McCoy published in 1874. The illustrator is Henry Worrall.

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Samuel Jay Crumbine

Dr. Samuel Crumbine in the State Board of Health office with his assistants Warren Crumbine and Bernice Vreeland.

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Reb Russell

Reb Russell seated on his horse Rebel. Born Lafayette H. Russell in Coffeyville, Kansas in 1905, Reb got his nickname while playing football at the University of Nebraska and Northwestern University. Russell excelled at the sport, gaining All American status in 1930 and playing briefly with the New York Giants and the Philadelphia Eagles. However, he chose instead to pursue a movie career after he got a bit part in Universal Pictures' The All-American (1932). Because he was an excellent rider, Russell became an actor in western movies. He appeared in a number of low-budget independent westerns, including The Man from Hell (1934), Fighting Through (1934), Outlaw Rule (1935), and Lightning Triggers (1935).

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James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok

This formal portrait take in Hays, Kansas shows James Butler " Wild Bill" Hickok, 1837-1876. The legendary lawman and gun-slinger begins his career in 1858 as peace officer of the Monticello Township in the Kansas Territory of Johnson County. For a number of years Hickok also works as a government scout, guide and deputy U.S. marshal across the Great Plains. His reputation as a skilled marksman proceeds him wherever he went. In 1869 Hickok is elected marshal of Hays, Kansas and sheriff of Ellis County, Kansas. A role he serves until 1870. In 1871, he is hired as Abilene, Kansas' town marshal. As marshal he earns fame for being a quick draw and for spending most of his time playing cards. Hickok is killed on August 01, 1876 while playing a game of poker at a saloon in the Deadwood, Dakota Territory.

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Jess Willard

This sepia colored photograph shows Jess Willard, 1881-1968, defeating Jack Johnson, 1878-1946, in Havana, Cuba for the title of heavyweight champion of the world.

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Walter Johnson

This is a photograph of Walter Johnson, 1887-1946, as he appeared pitching for the Washington Senators baseball team at the peak of his career. Nicknamed "The Big Train" for the speed and power of his pitches, Johnson was born and raised on a farm near Humboldt, Kansas.

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Langston Hughes

Photograph of Langston Hughes copied from the Shawnee County Historical Society, Bulletin #47.

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Isaac McCoy

A portrait of missionary Reverend Isaac McCoy at age 47. Copied from a painting. Born the son of a Baptist preacher in Uniontown, Pennsylvania, in 1784, McCoy spent his youth in Louisville, Kentucky. He married at age nineteen and moved to the Indiana Territory to preach in communities of settlers, French traders, and Indians. While there, McCoy witnessed what he considered the degradation and suffering of tribes at the hands of whites. He was one of the first to suggest the removal of Eastern tribes to the West. McCoy achieved mild success operating missions in Michigan and Indiana Territory, and training future Kansas missionaries, such as Jotham Meeker, Johnston Lykins, and Robert Simmerwell. He spent progressively more time in Washington D.C., lobbing for the establishment of reservations in the future states of Kansas and Oklahoma. McCoy found sympathy for his proposals, and in 1830 personally surveyed future Indian lands in what would become Kansas. The following year McCoy moved his family to Westport, Missouri, near present-day Kansas City.

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