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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 25 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

J. M. Webster & family, Wyandotte, Kansas. 286 miles west of St. Louis Mo.

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

This stereograph shows J. M. Webster with two children that are seated on a horse near Wyandotte, Kansas. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.

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General J. Lane's house, Lawrence, Kansas. 323 miles west of St. Louis, Mo.

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

THis stereograph showing James Henry Lane's house, Lawrence, Kansas. The Kansas River and the town of Lawrence are visible in the background. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.

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Potawatomie Indians at St. Mary's Mission, Kansas. 375 miles west of St. Louis Mo.

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

This stereograph shows Potawatomie Indians at the St. Mary's Mission, Pottawatomie County, Kansas. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.

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Rail bridge across Kansas River

Gardner, Alexander, 1821-1882

This stereograph shows a railroad bridge across the Kansas River at State Line, Kansas. There is a locomotive crossing the bridge and along the banks are logs that have washed up on shore. It is from Alexander Gardner's series, Across the Continent on the Union Pacific Railway, Eastern Division.

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Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Topeka to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, in Washington, D. C. She described farm and financial difficulties, especially her frustration with John, an incompetent hired hand. She also considered releasing her "girl" to save money and taking in Sister Tite as an unpaid but potentially helpful guest. Mary requested instructions concerning lumber, asked for seeds and carpets, and mentioned local happenings. She hoped that the statehood of Kansas would encourage Cyrus to return quickly. The letter has no signature.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

In Lawrence on January 19, 1861, attending the meeting of what proved to be the last territorial legislature, Ingalls wrote about everyone's interest in happenings outside the territory: namely, congressional action on the "Kansas Admission Bill" and the "Pacific Rail Road Bill," as well as "the condition of affairs of the South ['the secession movement']. Especially bad weather--"the snow is quite deep and the temperature below zero constantly"--had left Kansas somewhat isolated, and as they waited for news the legislature was "not doing much except discussing Union resolutions, endorsing Major [Robert] Anderson [commander of U.S. troops at Fort Sumter], and divorcing Every body that applies for rupture of the bonds of matrimony."

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Governor George Monroe Beebe, annual message

Beebe, George Monroe 1836-1927

George Beebe assumed the title of Acting Governor of Kansas Territory upon the resignation of Samuel Medary. In this printed message from the Executive Office, Kansas Territory (Lecompton) to the territorial legislature, Beebe commented on Medary and other issues relating to Kansas Territory. He included information from the auditor about the amount of taxes that had been collected. He also referenced the pending dissolution of the Union and the "gloom" that brought to all.

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