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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Lilla Day Monroe and Lillian Mitchner

Lilla Day Monroe (left) was one of Topeka?s leading citizens during the early part of the twentieth century. Over the course of her life, she served as president of the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association, editor of "The Club Member" and "The Kansas Woman?s Journal," and as a founding member of the Good Government Club. Lillian Mitchner (right) was state president of the Kansas Woman?s Christian Temperance Union (WCTU).

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Charles Monroe Sheldon

Charles Monroe Sheldon, pastor of Central Congregational Church in Topeka, Kansas, organized the first Black kindergarten west of the Mississippi River. It was known as the Tennesseetown Kindergarten. He is best known for his novel "In His Steps" or "What Would Jesus Do?"

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H. Butterfield to Governor John A. Martin

H. Butterfield of Salem, Jewell County, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka with a list of questions about the recently amended alcohol prohibition law regulating the sale of alcohol by druggists. Butterifeld asks whether any person can sign a prescription for alcohol, whether a druggist has a right to sell alcohol to someone the druggist knows will get drunk, what can be done when the county offices will not prosecute violations of the law, whether a minor has a right to a permit as a druggist to sell alcohol, and whether a billiard hall saloon that remains open on Sundays can be declared a nuisance and prosecuted under the law. Butterfield concludes by expressing his support for prohibition and asking for better enforcement of the law.

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Tea service

This silver tea set was given to Reverend Joseph E. and Nancy Jane (McPherson) Hopkins for their 25th wedding anniversary in 1903. The couple moved to Kansas from Illinois in the late 1870s. Their religious service took them to a number of churches around the state. In 1903, they served at the Methodist Church in Sedan where church members presented them with this tea service for their silver wedding anniversary. The set was put to good use the following year when the Hopkins hosted temperance advocate Carry A. Nation for lunch at their home.

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W.H. Makeaney to Governor John St. John

Makeaney, W.H.

Kansas Governor St. John is invited to speak on temperance at a camp meeting in August near Melvern, Kansas. Pastor Makeaney, writing from Quenemo, Osage County, Kansas, would prefer a Sunday speech, taking advantage of the maximum attendance that day. MaKeaney is a Methodist minister.

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Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union general correspondence

This is correspondence sent and received by Mary Evelyn Dobbs, corresponding secretary of the Kansas Woman's Christian Temperance Union from 1907 to 1939. The letters arrived from people across the state, including the presidents of county chapters of the KWCTU. Most correspondence relates to planned public speeches and visits intended to establish and support new branches of the KWCTU. There are also communications from the state organization to local units. Specific items include a letter dated July 1, 1918, from Dobbs to F.L. Pinet with a manuscript entitled "Early Factors in Kansas Prohibition" intended for publication in the Kansas Teacher, advertising contracts for the KWCTU periodical Our Messenger, and a letter written to Dobbs from Clara E. Keys, a WCTU missionary in Africa. One letter recognizes Mary Sibbitt as the organizer of comfort kits provided for soldiers at Fort Leavenworth. Sibbitt, known as the "Kansas Cyclone," was an founding officer of the International Association of Women Ministers. There are several other groups of official Kansas WCTU records on Kansas Memory. They can be found by selecting Collections - Manuscript - KWCTU/Mary Evelyn Dobbs.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence sent and received by members of the Kansas State Temperance Union, primarily Rev. W. L. Dexter, secretary, Robert Norris, secretary, Julian K. Codding, lawyer, and William T. Jones, solicitor. Correspondents include Elizabeth P. Hutchinson, president of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union, Rev. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the American Anti-Saloon League, Mary Evelyn Dobbs, Rev. Charles W. Whorrall, and William H. McCamish, assistant attorney general of Wyandotte County. Included in this correspondence are several signed petitions to members of the U.S. Senate from citizens in Arkansas City, Kirwin, and Abilene asking them to vote against the Hamilton Bill which they argue "would annul the solemn pledge of the Government to protect the Indians against the introduction and sale of intoxicants in the Indian territory." Some financial records are also included, such as a report from the finance committee for the previous year, ending February 15, 1905, and receipts and disbursements by month, signed by financial manager S. H. Pitcher. Although Kansas was the first state to adopt a constitutional amendment prohibiting the sale of intoxicating liquors in 1880, the law was largely unenforced.

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Temperance history correspondence

Correspondence relating to the Kansas State Temperance Union and its activities promoting the enforcement of prohibition in the state of Kansas. Frank M. Stahl served as superintendent and John Marshall served as attorney. They wrote a number of the letters contained in this collection. Leaders of the temperance movement frequently corresponded with county attorneys, civic leaders, ministers, and pastors. Included are several letters supporting James A. Lyons of Langdon, Kansas, who was charged with selling intoxicating liquors, and a circular announcing the guilty verdict in the case of Assistant Attorney General C. W. Trickett of Wyandotte County, Kansas, who accepted illegal fees in the prosecution of liquor cases. The collection contains correspondence from numerous Kansas communities.

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