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Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 40 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute included a list of books that he wished to add to his Unitarian church library. Nute commented on the difficulties experienced by those attempting to spread Christianity in Kansas. He also observed that immigration to Kansas was increasing.

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John S. Brown to Edward Everett Hale

Brown, John S.

John S. Brown wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Brown informed Hale that he had substituted for Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, for the previous six months while Nute lectured in the East. Brown stated that he wanted to serve in Kansas as a missionary but lacked financial resources. He asked Hale for funds to support his missionary efforts.

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Ephraim Nute to Edward Everett Hale

Nute, Ephraim

Rev. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to Edward Everett Hale, a member of the New England Emigrant Aid Company's Executive Committee. Nute inquired about the possibility of Hale arranging a loan of $2000 at reasonable interest for the completion of the Unitarian Church in Lawrence. He reported on the high rates of interest being charged for loans in Kansas Territory and on the general effects of the panic of 1857 on the territorial economy. Nute also expressed his dissatisfaction with the Buchanan administration's handling of the Lecompton Constitution and his hope that a change in presidential administration in 1860 would result in Kansas' admission as a free state.

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Anna Margaret Watson Randolph, diary

Randolph, Anna Margaret Watson, 1838-1917

This brief diary, kept by Anna Margaret (Watson) Randolph, begins with her move to Kansas in an entry dated August 17, 1858. These six entries at the beginning of her diary provide details about her family's journey from Ohio to Kansas Territory, included a number of interesting accounts of their journey on a riverboat. Their boat ran aground several times and, interspersed among her descriptions of these difficulties, Anna wrote about her sister Mary Jane, the weather, and her personal observances of other passengers. She also filled her diary with her frustrations and concerns during their arduous journey west.

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Settlers on Little Sugar Creek

Stewart, John E.

This listing of the settlers along Little Sugar Creek includes information about each settler, the resources in the area, and local buildings. It also includes an account of an attack by the Missouri ruffians in which a number of men were carried off to Westport, Missouri. It was most likely compiled by John E. Stewart at the request of Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee.

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John E. Stewart reminiscence

Stewart, John E

This undated document, presumably written by John E. Stewart, relates the author's experiences in Kansas Territory. The reminiscence begins with a description of how he entered the territory and the manner in which he constructed a house. Then, intermixed with accounts of his agricultural efforts and other day-to-day activities, there are brief mentions of the political situation in the territory. The main focus of the document then turns to when Stewart was a member of the Wakarusa Liberty Guard, including a description of the murder of Charles Dow, the murder of Hoyt, the Branson rescue, and other encounters with border ruffians.

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S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

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M. M. Campbell to Brethren of the Osawatomie Bible Society

Campbell, M. M.

This letter, written by M. M. Campbell from Monrovia, Kansas Territory, requested information about the progress of colportage in the Osawatomie area, asking if they had divided the area into districts and appointed colporteurs to distribute religious materials to Kansas settlers. To encourage this, Campbell mentioned the great success of other colporteurs, such as Brother Blood from Manhattan, Kansas. He also encouraged the residents of Osawatomie to remain faithful to their duty as Christians, and to work for the furtherance of the kingdom. Campbell requested more detailed information about the local Bible Society.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory, to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. He described living conditions in Topeka. Holliday expressed his intent to write to Mr. McFarland and his thanks for letters recently received. He mentioned Samuel Y. Lum, a Congregational minister, who was sleeping in his cabin. He also mentioned his presidency with the Topeka Town Association, agency with the New England Emigrant Aid Company, and his own business. Finally, Holliday expressed hopes of a sawmill and referred to the possibility of trouble with Missourians. A few lines have been cut and removed from the lower part of pages 7 and 8.

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Samuel Newell Simpson to Hiram Hill

Simpson, Samuel Newell

Samuel N. Simpson wrote to Hiram Hill from Lawrence, Kansas Territory, updating him on the status of Hill's rents and outlining the rental agreements he had arranged with the various tenants. Simpson mentioned he had raised the $5000 for the church, as promised, and that Hill's money could not be invested in Wyandotte lands until they were properly surveyed. He added that he had recently brought firearms to Kansas Territory, stating " I think our trouble in Kansas has only begun -- but let the war and even dissolution come -- the quicker the better."

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