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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Milton M. Powers to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Milton M. Powers, Deputy Clerk of Court in Columbus, Ohio wrote to Cyrus K. Holliday, Free State leader and founder of Topeka, Kansas Territory. Powers had read of Holliday's activities in northern newspapers. A presentation of the Wrongs of Kansas, emphasizing Andrew H. Reeder and Samuel N. Wood's experiences, had emotionally motivated Powers to write and assure Holliday of his support. Once a Jeffersonian Democrat, but convicted that the party had abandoned its principles, Powers had become a Republican. He stated that the entire nation was attuned to events in Kansas Territory, and he believed that these events would have intense impact on the nation's future.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Lawrence, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who, accompanied by Mrs. Edward C. K. Garvey, had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to her second child. Meanwhile, Cyrus Holliday (who was Vice President of the upper territorial legislative body, the Council) had passed four bills, including one establishing Topeka as the Shawnee county seat. He bought new clothes for the session, since Lawrence had become more refined, with a new hotel. Holliday mentioned emigration to Pikes Peak, the Topeka bridge, trouble in L[i]nn county, and meeting three women, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. [Robert] Morrow, and Mrs. O'Donell (possibly Mrs. William O'Donnall) in Lawrence. He proposed that Liz, Mary Holliday's younger sister, return with her.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from the Wyandotte Convention to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. His efforts to ensure that Topeka would be the capital of Kansas Territory had set back his personal political career (territorially and nationally, that is; he had recently been elected mayor of Topeka). Cyrus anxiously awaited the return of Mary and their children, Lillie and newborn Charles.

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

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unknown writer to Hiram Hill

The author of this letter, most likely Henry F. Parker, wrote to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, communicating to Hill roughly the amount of property taxes he owed and seeking confirmation of the specific lot numbers Hill owned.

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J. Lee Knight

J. Lee Knight was a photographer. He owned the New River Side Galley in Topeka, Kansas Territory.

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Barclay's Business Directory of Leavenworth for 1859

Pierse, Allen

In addition to a listing of businesses and advertisements, the directory included the elected officials for the city of Leavenworth for 1858-59 and the newspapers published in Leavenworth. A few women are listed as owners of businesses. The information for the directory was compiled by Allen Pierse.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

A formal portrait of Cyrus Kurtz Holliday (1826-1900), of Topeka, Kansas. Holliday came to Kansas Territory in 1854 from Meadville, Pennsylvania. He was an agent for the New England Emigrant Aid Company, one of the founders of Topeka, and was the first president of the Topeka Town Association. He was very active in territorial political activities, including the Topeka movement, he was a delegate to the Topeka Constitutional Convention, and served in the Kansas State Senate in 1861. Holliday was also the first president of the Atchison, Topeka and Santa Fe Railway, and served as one of the railroad's directors for nearly 40 years.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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