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Objects and Artifacts -- Communication Artifacts (Remove)
People -- Notable Kansans (Remove)
Date -- 1960s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 8, showing 10 records out of 75 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Richard E. Hickock

Kansas State Penitentiary

An inmate photograph of Richard Hickock copied from his Kansas State Prison inmate file. Hickock and his accomplice, Perry Smith, were convicted of first degree murder for the brutal 1959 killings of Herb and Bonnie Clutter, their daughter, Nancy, and son, Kenyon, in Holcomb, Kansas. The murders inspired the true-crime novel "In Cold Blood" by Truman Capote.

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John Anderson, Jr.,

This colored portrait shows John Anderson, Jr., a lawyer and politician from Olathe, Kansas. He begins his political career in 1946 when he is elected as a Republican for county attorney of Johnson County. In 1952 Anderson is elected to the Kansas Senate representing District Sixth of Johnson County. A position he serves from 1953 to 1956 before his appointment as Attorney General of Kansas. He serves from 1956 to 1961 and wins the elections of 1956 and 1958. In the November general election of 1960, Anderson defeats Democratic incumbent George Docking to become the thirty-sixth governor of Kansas serving from 1961 to 1965. He is also the first governor to occupy Cedar Crest, which became the official home of the Kansas Governor.

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George Docking

This is an informal portrait of Governor George Docking, 1904-1964, sitting at his desk signing paperwork at the Statehouse in Topeka, Kansas. Docking, a native of Clay Center, Kansas, served as a Democratic governor of Kansas from 1957 to 1961. His son, Robert B. Docking, 1925-1983, served as a Democratic governor of Kansas from 1967 to 1975.

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Anonymous resident to the governor's wife

An anonymous Kansas resident writes the wife of Governor John Anderson Jr. of Topeka concerning a proposed atheist colony near Stockton, Kansas. The author expresses her opposition to the colony and regards it as a plot of communist Russia. Madalyn Murray [O'Hair] of Baltimore, Maryland, proposed the colony after the Supreme Court decision in Murray v. Curlett (1963) declared prayer in schools unconstitutional. Ms. Murray formed Other Americans, Inc. (a Maryland corporation) to advance atheist interests and establish an atheist colony in Kansas. Carl Brown, a farmer near Stockton and former Kansas state senator, served as a director of that corporation. Mr. Brown, an avowed atheist, deeded 160 acres of land near Stockton to the corporation. During the 1950s and 1960s, the national debate over the role of religion in public life centered on the use of prayer in public schools. Many people associated atheists with communists and approached this issue from the larger context of the cold war. Historical Society staff removed the author's name and place of residence from this copy of the letter to comply with her request for privacy.

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Wallace Gray to Governor William Avery

Gray, Wallace

Wallace Gray, Kirk Chair of Philosophy, Southwestern College in Winfield, Kansas writes Governor William Avery of Topeka concerning civil rights legislation. Mr. Gray expresses his support for legislation that would reduce discrimination of minorities at the local level. The letter describes an effort by college students to integrate the downtown barbershops of Winfield and includes a one page report on that subject. A letter from the Pre-Ministerial Club, Southwestern College, advocating civil rights legislation and the integration of the barbershops of Kansas is also included. An effort to strengthen the Kansas Act Against Discrimination in the form of a "Fair Housing Bill" (Senate Bill No. 166) was currently being considered by the legislature. Local concerns such as these reflected a national debate on civil rights reform that resulted in the Civil Rights Act of 1964 and the Voting Rights Act of 1965.

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Killer, 21, spared as governor acts

Topeka State Journal Company

A Topeka State Journal article reports on Governor George Docking's opposition to capital punishment. Docking commuted the death sentence of Bobby Joe Spencer to life in prison. Spencer was sentenced to death by the Wyandotte County District Court for killing his landlady. The Governor's strong opposition to capital punishment partly explains the eight year hiatus on state-sponsored executions in Kansas between 1954-1962.

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Richard Eugene Hickock inmate case file

Kansas State Penitentiary

The Kansas State Penitentiary case file on Richard Hickock, inmate number 14746. Hickock and his accomplice, Perry Smith, were convicted of first degree murder for the brutal 1959 killings of Herb and Bonnie Clutter, their daughter, Nancy, and son, Kenyon, in Holcomb, Kansas. The murders inspired the non-fiction novel "In Cold Blood" by Truman Capote. Hickock was executed by hanging on April 14, 1965. Please note that some images have been removed in accordance with K.S.A. 45-221(a)(29) and have been labeled with pages indicating their removal. Additional redactions of personally identifiable information made in accordance with K. S. A. 2005 Supp. 45-221(a)(30).

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Perry Edward Smith inmate case file

Kansas State Penitentiary

The Kansas State Penitentiary case file on Perry Edward Smith, inmate number 14747. Smith and his accomplice, Richard Hickock, were convicted of first degree murder for the brutal 1959 killings of Herb and Bonnie Clutter, their daughter, Nancy, and son, Kenyon, in Holcomb, Kansas. The murders inspired the non-fiction novel "In Cold Blood" by Truman Capote. Smith was executed by hanging on April 14, 1965. Please note that some images have been removed in accordance with K.S.A. 45-221(a)(29) and have been labeled with pages indicating their removal.

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John Anderson, Jr.

This formal portrait shows John Anderson, Jr., a lawyer and politician from Olathe, Kansas. He begins his political career in 1946 when he is elected as a Republican for county attorney of Johnson County. In 1952 Anderson is elected to the Kansas Senate representing District Sixth of Johnson County. A position he serves from 1953 to 1956 before his appointment as Attorney General of Kansas. He serves from 1956 to 1961 and wins the elections of 1956 and 1958. In the November general election of 1960, Anderson defeats Democratic incumbent George Docking to become the thirty-sixth governor of Kansas serving from 1961 to 1965. He is also the first governor to occupy Cedar Crest, which became the official home of the Kansas Governor.

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Garner Edward Shriver

Garner Edward Shriver was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives, 1947-1951, and to the Kansas Senate from 1953-1960. He served as a U.S Representative from 1961-1977, and as legal counsel for the Senate Veteran's Affairs Committee.

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