Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Objects and Artifacts -- Communication Artifacts (Remove)
Government and Politics -- Local Government (Remove)
Community Life -- Community services (Remove)
People (Remove)
Home and Family (Remove)
Government and Politics (Remove)
Places (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 10 records out of 10 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| | next >>

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from the Wyandotte Convention to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Meadville, Pennsylvania. His efforts to ensure that Topeka would be the capital of Kansas Territory had set back his personal political career (territorially and nationally, that is; he had recently been elected mayor of Topeka). Cyrus anxiously awaited the return of Mary and their children, Lillie and newborn Charles.

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Much of this interesting letter, dated November 21, 1858, from Sumner, Kansas Territory, describes the Ingalls law practice and the nature of a "frontier" court proceedings that often attracted "nearly all the population." According to Ingalls, "the chief difficulty arising [in the courts came] from the conflict of the two Codes, adopted by two hostile legislatures, each of which had adherents who call the other 'bogus.'" Ingalls also discussed the business of land sales, as something many others successfully combined with the practice of law.

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Although Ingalls began this relatively brief letter from Sumner with comments on the local election (he won the race for city attorney), he devoted most of it to the Pike's Peak Gold Rush--"the amount and character of the emigration to Pike's Peak is truly astonishing. . . . [T] military roads are already thronged with anxious hundreds, on foot, dragging hand carts, on mules, and with ox teams."

previewthumb

Albert C. Morton to Hiram Hill

Morton, Albert C.

Albert Morton wrote from Quindaro, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, describing at length the efforts of Quindaro's citizens to grade a large avenue through the town. Morton added that Quindaro was about to establish a city charter, which, if approved by the Legislature, would require the taxation of the citizens. He also mentioned a shooting the night before of a proslavery man who had lost his seat to free statesman Charles Chadwick in a recent election under the Lecompton Constitution.

previewthumb

unknown writer to Hiram Hill

The author of this letter, most likely Henry F. Parker, wrote to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts, communicating to Hill roughly the amount of property taxes he owed and seeking confirmation of the specific lot numbers Hill owned.

previewthumb

C. E. Blood to Hiram Hill

Blood, C.E.

C. E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Blood informed Hill of an upcoming meeting of the Manhattan Town Association, and told him that he should send a power of attorney to a local citizen to act as his representative. Blood also said that he had not received money for the city tax he had previously requested, and warned Hill that the city authorities would sell his lots if they were not paid.

previewthumb

J. Lee Knight

J. Lee Knight was a photographer. He owned the New River Side Galley in Topeka, Kansas Territory.

previewthumb

Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

previewthumb

Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

previewthumb

Your city can protect the babies

Kansas. State Board of Health

This poster issued by the Kansas State Board of Health describes how a community can help keep babies healthy.

previewthumb
<< previous| | next >>