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Date -- 1890s (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 3 records out of 3 total, starting on record 1, ending on 3

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.

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Helen Adams, adopted daughter of Zu Adams

Downing, George

This is a photograph of Helen Adams, adopted by Zu Adams in 1896. In 1876, when Zu was seventeen, her father became Secretary of the new Kansas Historical Society, and she became his unpaid assistant. Later she was given a salary and the title of librarian. At the time of her father?s death in 1899, both she and he hoped that she would succeed him as Secretary. When George Martin emerged as a candidate for that position, however, Zu reluctantly withdrew her own candidacy. She worked as Martin?s assistant until her own death in 1911. Zu never married, remaining in the family home and raising her younger brothers and sisters and Helen.

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Zu and Helen Adams

Taylor & George

This is a photograph of Zu Adams (left), Helen Adams (center) and an unidentified girl. Zu adopted Helen in 1896. In 1876, when Zu was seventeen, her father became Secretary of the new Kansas Historical Society, and she became his unpaid assistant. Later she was given a salary and the title of librarian. At the time of her father?s death in 1899, both she and he hoped that she would succeed him as Secretary. When George Martin emerged as a candidate for that position; however, Zu reluctantly withdrew her own candidacy. She worked as Martin?s assistant until her own death in 1911. Zu never married, remaining in the family home and raising her younger brothers and sisters and Helen.

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