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Thematic Time Period -- Age of Reform, 1880 - 1917 (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
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Page 1 of 6, showing 10 records out of 59 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Arthur Capper

An informal portrait of Kansas Governor Arthur Capper, 1865-1951, signing the "Bone Dry Law" passed by the Kansas Legislature. The law prohibited possession of liquor within the state and ended direct shipments of liquor to Kansas from out-of-state vendors. Capper, a native of Garnett, Kansas, served Kansas as Governor from 1915 to 1919, and as a U. S. Senator from 1919 to 1949.

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Spanish American War

Rockett

Generals McArthur and Funston on horseback at Caloocan, Philippines, during the Spanish American War.

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Jeremiah Simpson, United States Representative from Kansas

Bell, C. M.

Portrait of Jeremiah "Sockless Jerry" Simpson, Populist, United States Representative from Kansas, 1897-1899.

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Theodore Roosevelt at Baldwin, Kansas

Bridwell, Arthur

This is a photograph of Theodore Roosevelt, William Allen White, Henry J. Allen, Joseph Bristow, and Osmon Grant Markham standing on the back of a passenger car at the Baldwin, Kansas railroad station.

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Foster Dwight Coburn

Downing, George

Portrait of Foster Dwight Coburn, Secretary of the Kansas Board of Agriculture.

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Lutie A. Lytle

Portrait of Lutie Lytle, one of the nation's earliest African American female lawyers. Her family came to Topeka and lived at 1435 Monroe Street and Lutie and her brothers attended Topeka schools, including Topeka High School. Lytle graduated from Central Tennessee College and was admitted to the Criminal Court in Memphis, Tennessee, after passing an oral exam. She is reported to be the first African American woman to be licensed to practice in Tennessee, and third in the United States. After returning to Topeka, she became the first African American woman admitted to the Kansas bar. This portrait was copied from A New Negro for a New Century.

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Foster Dwight Coburn

Farmers Advocate

Foster Dwight Coburn, Secretary of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture, standing in a corn field.

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George H. Hodges

This campaign billboard urges for the reelection of Governor George Hartshorn Hodges, 1866-1947. Hodges as Kansas governor for one term from 1913 to 1915.

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Walter Johnson

This is a photograph of Walter Johnson, 1887-1946, as he appeared pitching for the Washington Senators baseball team at the peak of his career. Nicknamed "The Big Train" for the speed and power of his pitches, Johnson was born and raised on a farm near Humboldt, Kansas.

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Mary Elizabeth Lease

Deane

Mary Elizabeth (Clyens) Lease is perhaps the best-known Kansas Populist. She was born in Pennsylvania on September 11, 1850 to Irish immigrants. At the age of twenty she moved to Osage Mission, Kansas, in order to teach school at St. Anne?s Academy. While there, she met and married Charles L. Lease, a local pharmacist. After several unsuccessful attempts at farming, Lease turned her attention to the plight of her fellow farmers, and by 1890, her passionate criticisms of railroads and big business made her a formidable force in the newly formed People's (Populist) Party. She became a well-known lecturer for the Populist cause, traveling throughout the West, Midwest, and South. Although this statement has in fact been misattributed to her, she is most known for her assertion that farmers must "raise less corn and more hell.? Her zeal and refusal to compromise eventually alienated her from mainstream Populists, and by 1896 she had turned her attention toward other reform causes, including prohibition and suffrage. She divorced Charles in 1902, spending the remainder of her life living with various children on the Atlantic coast. She passed away on October 29, 1933 in New York state.

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