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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

On the first leg of his move to Sumner, Kansas Territory, John J. Ingalls, a 24-year-old Massachusetts lawyer, wrote this brief letter from Boston, Mass., to his father, Elias T. Ingalls. Here Ingalls wrote regarding the fare and "the best method of getting West."

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John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

The biggest share of this 8-page letter is devoted to comments on the weather and the environment, in and around Atchison, where Ingalls now had a law practice (for a time, he continued to live in Sumner). He missed some aspects of "Massachusetts weather," but overall he thought Kansas superior: "I have not had a cold in six months and but one or two since I came here . . . [and] The attacks of melancholy and despondency to which I was once a prey have also almost entirely disappeared." Ingalls also wrote of two arson fires--"a large grocery house" and "the steamer Hesperian," and the expected fate of the suspect then in custody.

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Benjamin Stringfellow

Portrait of Benjamin Stringfellow, attorney and pro-slavery activist. In 1838, Stringfellow settled in Missouri, where he served in the house of representatives, and was attorney general for four years. After moving to Weston, Missouri, he became a member and officer of the Platte County Self-Defensive Association (an aggressive pro-slavery organization). He wrote a pamphlet entitled "Negro Slavery No Evil, or the North and the South." In 1858, Stringfellow moved to Atchison, Kansas Territory, where he helped build the town and was an attorney for the Kansas City, St. Joseph & Council Bluffs Railroad.

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W.T. Sherman to Robert Campbell

Sherman, William T. (William Tecumseh), 1820-1891

A letter to Robert Campbell regarding the debt that Sherman, Ewing & McCook were trying to collect. As with similar correspondence, this letter conveys a sense of the legal and financial transactions that played a major part in the firm's business activities in the territory.

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John Palmer Usher

This black and white photograph shows John Palmer Usher, (1816-1889). A lawyer from Indiana and a member of President Abraham Lincoln's cabinet. Usher served only two years as the seventh U.S. Secretary of the Interior, (1863-1865), before returning to private life. In 1865, he become the chief counsel for the Kansas Pacific Railroad a position he held until his retirement in 1880. Usher also resumed his political career when he moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1872, and was elected to serve one term as the town's mayor, (1879 to 1881). On April 13, 1889, at the age of seventy-three, he passed away at the University Hospital in Philadelphia after a lengthy illness. Burial was at the Oak Hill Cemetery in Lawrence, Kansas.

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A. J. Beach to Samuel N. Wood

Beach, A. J.

Writing from Beach Valley (Rice County) in Kansas Territory, A. J. Beach requests Samuel Wood's legal advice with regard to Beach's options in a bridge dispute. It seemed that Beach had received a charter to build a toll bridge [over Cow Creek], and another party (William Edwards, et al) put up a "temporary" one before his was finished. They were now diverting traffic away from Beach's completed bridge. "I wish to know if anything can be done with them at law . . ."

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Sherman, Ewing and McCook Attornies at Law to Mess Walker

Sherman, Ewing & McCook

A letter to Mess Walker, Williams & Miller, of Weston Missouri, regarding the payment of a debt that should be paid promptly to the firm of Sherman, Ewing & McCook, Attorneys at Law.

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W.T. Sherman, Thomas Ewing, & McCook, to George B. Parker

Sherman, Ewing & McCook

Although unclear as to the exact nature of the litigation, this letter from the Leavenworth firm pertained to the taking of depositions in "the case against the steamboat Isabella". The Isabella was a side-wheeler which made regular runs to Sioux City during 1858, and in this case apparently came to the aid of the Kate Howard when ice forced her to "give up her trip".

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Leigh R. Webber to Miss Brown

Webber, L. R.

A letter written by Leigh R. Webber from "Steamer Robert Campbell Jr. near Liberty Mo.," is addressed to Miss Brown, a daughter of John Stillman Brown, a Unitarian minister who lived west of Lawrence, Kansas. Webber describes how his fellow troops have become more experienced soldiers "who fight for liberty and law." He discusses the march from Fort Riley to Fort Leavenworth and conditions on the boat that was taking them further south. He also mentiones William Brown's new law position with former Kansas Territory governor Wilson Shannon.

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Wendell Willkie campaigning in Pittsburg, Kansas

These five photographs show Wendell Willkie's campaigning for the U.S. Presidency, at the Missouri Pacific Railroad Station, in Pittsburg, Kansas. Willkie, the Republican nominee, chose the towns of Pittsburg and Coffeyville to kickoff his campaign because of prior connections to the area. He had once taught high school history in Coffeyville before becoming a corporate lawyer and political candidate. During his ten minute stop in Pittsburg, Willkie spoke to an estimated crowd of about 1,000 against the policies of the New Deal and his challenger President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Willkie was defeated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in the November election.

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