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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 27 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Edward Russell

This is a portrait of Edward Russell, a newspaperman and politician. He came to Kansas Territory in 1856, and located in Elwood, in Doniphan County, Kansas. Shortly after moving to Kansas, Russell started a newspaper that espoused the free-state side. In August, 1858, he lobbied Doniphan county citizens against the Lecompton Constitution. In that same year, Russell, D. W. Wilder and others founded a free-state paper. Russell later served in the Kansas legislature, and held several state offices.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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George Henry Hoyt

A portrait of George Henry Hoyt, a resident of Leavenworth, Kansas. He served as Kansas Attorney General from 1867 to 1869. During the Civil War, he was Captain of Company K, Seventh Kansas Volunteer Cavalry and promoted to Lieutenant Colonel of the Fifteenth Kansas Volunteer Cavalry.

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Simeon Montgomery Thorp

Fassett, S. M.

A portrait of Simeon Montgomery Thorp, who resided in Lawrence, Kansas, and was State Superintendent of Public Instruction. He served as Kansas State Senator in 1863. In that same year, Thorp was killed in Quantrill's raid.

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Sidney Clarke

This cabinet card shows Sidney Clarke, (1831-1900), an abolitionist from Lawrence, Kansas and supporter of the Free Soil Movement. Clarke began his career as a public servant when he enlisted, in 1859, as a volunteer with the Frontier Guard. Recognized for his effective leadership skills, Clarke was appointed in 1862 as Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers. The following year he became the Assistant Provost Marshal General for Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Dakota. Clarke returned to Kansas shortly before the close of the Civil War and was elected, in 1864, to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican. He was reelected in 1866 and 1868, but was defeated in 1870 due to various scandals he was associated with. In 1878, Clarke resumed his political career when he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives as an independent. Clarke's career in Kansas politics came to an end, in 1880, when he was unable to win a seat in the Kansas Senate. His life as a politician was once again revived, when Clarke moved to Oklahoma in the 1880s and became an advocate for settlement and statehood in the territory. Clarke's tireless efforts became a reality, when Oklahoma became the forty-sixth state on November 16, 1907. Sidney Clarke passed away on June 18, 1909 in Oklahoma City at the age of seventy-eight.

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Sidney Clarke

Alden & Shellabarger

This cabinet card shows Sidney Clarke, (1831-1909), an abolitionist from Lawrence, Kansas, and supporter of the Free Soil Movement. Clarke began his career as a public servant when he enlisted in 1859 as a volunteer with the Frontier Guard. Recognized for his effective leadership skills, Clarke was appointed in 1862 as Assistant Adjutant General of Volunteers. The following year he became the Assistant Provost Marshal General for Kansas, Nebraska, Colorado, and Dakota. Clarke returned to Kansas shortly before the close of the Civil War and was elected in 1864 to the U.S. House of Representatives as a Republican. He was re-elected in 1866 and 1868, but was defeated in 1870 due to various scandals he was associated with. In 1878, Clarke resumed his political career when he was elected to the Kansas House of Representatives as an independent. Clarke's career in Kansas politics came to an end in 1880 when he was unable to win a seat in the Kansas Senate. His life as a politician was once again revived, when Clarke moved to Oklahoma in the 1880s and became an advocate for settlement and statehood in the territory. Clarke's tireless efforts became a reality, when Oklahoma became the forty-sixth state on November 16, 1907. Sidney Clarke passed away on June 18, 1909 in Oklahoma City at the age of seventy-eight.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Dowing, George

This cabinet card shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but McAfee's duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871, McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and he even gave up his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected, to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's Forty-Second District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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Josiah BreckBill McAfee

Bliss & Wentworth

This carte de visite shows Josiah BreckBill McAfee, (1830-1908). McAfee an ordained Lutheran minister from Pennsylvania migrated, in 1855, to Leavenworth, Kansas. A supporter of the Free-State movement, he was compelled to advocate against the teachings and beliefs of the institution of slavery in the Kansas territory. On September 1, 1862, Reverend McAfee enlisted with the Eleventh Regiment of the Kansas Volunteer Infantry and served as the first lieutenant of the company. He also served in various capacities during the war from captain to company chaplain. In 1863, McAfee was assigned to the Second Regiment of the Kansas Colored Volunteer Infantry. He mustered out of the military to accept the position as private secretary to Kansas Governor Samuel Crawford, (1865-1867). On August 18, 1867, he was appointed to the position of adjutant general. McAfee's long and successful military career came to a close, on March 3, 1869, but his duties as a civil servant were far from over. From 1870 to 1871 McAfee served as mayor of Topeka, Kansas. During his term he refused to issue liquor licenses to saloon owners in the capital city and even forgave his salary as mayor to support the temperance movement. In 1883 when McAfee was elected ,to the first of three terms, to the Kansas House of Representatives from Shawnee County's 42nd District seat he continued to advocate for prohibition by serving on temperance committees. McAfee's tireless and unselfish work for the citizens of Kansas came to an end on May 19, 1908, when he passed away at the age of seventy-eight at his Topeka home.

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