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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 26 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Lawson Wilson to Lewis Allen Alderson

These three letters are from Lawson Wilson in Lincoln County, North Carolina, to his friend, Lewis Allen Alderson, a student at the University of Ohio in Athens. In his letters, Wilson reminisces about time spent in Athens and seeks news about his old acquaintances. Wilson states that "Nullification has been making a great noise in the South," regarding the ability of individual states to abolish federal laws, particularly relating to tariffs and slave laws in South Carolina. He also mentions that the gold mines in the region are making "a great bustle" and congratulates Alderson on his recent marriage. Alderson moved to Atchison, Kansas, in 1858 and was a prominent Baptist minister. He died in Atchison in 1881.

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Joan of Arc of the coal fields, near Pittsburg, Kansas

New York Times

This newspaper clipping, from the New York Times, features a fourteen year old girl dubbed "The Joan of Arc of the Coal Fields." The daughter of a coal striker in southeast Kansas, she carried the American flag at the head of 6,000 marchers. The group of protesters marched through the coal fields showing their support for better wages and improved working conditions for their family members who worked in the camps.

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Tamping bar

Nels Ferguson, a Swedish immigrant, used this steel tamping bar in his work as a stonemason. He was involved in the construction of the Kansas Statehouse and the Topeka State Hospital. Ferguson later settled with his family in Richland Township in Jewell County, Kansas. He used his stonemason tools in the construction of his stone farmstead, Rock Hill Farm.

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Float

Nels Ferguson, a Swedish immigrant, used this float in his work as a stonemason. He was involved in the construction of the Kansas Statehouse and the Topeka State Hospital. Ferguson later settled with his family in Richland Township in Jewell County, Kansas. He used his stonemason tools in the construction of his stone farmstead, Rock Hill Farm.

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Plumb bob

Nels Ferguson, a Swedish immigrant, used this plumb bob in his work as a stonemason. He was involved in the construction of the Kansas Statehouse and the Topeka State Hospital. Ferguson later settled with his family in Richland Township in Jewell County, Kansas. He used his stonemason tools in the construction of his stone farmstead, Rock Hill Farm.

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Mason's level

Stanley Rule & Level Company

Nels Ferguson, a Swedish immigrant, used this level in his work as a stonemason. He was involved in the construction of the Kansas Statehouse and the Topeka State Hospital. Ferguson later settled with his family in Richland Township in Jewell County, Kansas. He used his stonemason tools in the construction of his stone farmstead, Rock Hill Farm.

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Kansas circa '90

Pierce, Jeff

This film depicts the life a young boy in Kansas in the 1890s. Filmed in the old Kansas Historical Society museum, the film portrays a dentist, photographer, blacksmith, and printer, and addresses the Kansas statehouse, Dodge City and cow towns, railroad expansion, the mechanization of agriculture, public schools, coal mining, salt mining, labor organizations, the Dalton Gang, Populism, and a diphtheria epidemic. The film was produced by The Junior League of Topeka, Inc.; The Channel 11 Club of Topeka; and the Extramural Independent Study Center, Division of Continuing Education, University of Kansas. The film was copyrighted by the University of Kansas and is provided by permission.

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Walter Augustus Huxman

This black and white photograph shows Walter Augustus Huxman, (1887-1972) possibly standing in the bucket of a large mine or quarrying shovel. He established his career as a public official by serving as Reno County's assistant attorney from 1915 to 1919, and later as the city attorney of Hutchinson, Kansas from 1919 to 1921. He was elected on November 3, 1936, as the twenty-seventh governor of Kansas. Failing to be reelected in 1939, Huxman was nominated by President Franklin D. Roosevelt to the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth District. He held this position until stepping down in 1962.

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C. E. Blood to Hiram Hill

Blood, C.E.

C.E. Blood wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to Hiram Hill in Massachusetts. Blood told Hill that, by mistake, a house had been built on one of Hill's town lots. He offered to trade lots with Hill, maintaining that both were of equal quality and value, and told him that the house would serve as the printing office of a new newspaper, the Manhattan Statesman.

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Custom mill

View of a custom mill at Brooks (Kansas ?).

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