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Page 1 of 1, showing 7 records out of 7 total, starting on record 1, ending on 7

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Andrew H. Reeder portrait

Hall, Cyrenius

Portrait of Andrew Horatio Reeder, 1807-1864, who was the first governor of Kansas Territory. In 1855, Reeder was removed from office by President Pierce and forced to leave Kansas when threatened with arrest for a charge of high treason issued by a pro-slavery grand jury. He escaped with the help of Thomas and Julia Stinson, who dressed him in women's clothing. In May 1856, Reeder disguised himself as a woodcutter (as depicted in this painting) and escaped via a steamboat on the Missouri River. Artist Cyrenius Hall painted this portrait in 1880.

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Samuel Reader self-portrait

Reader, Samuel J.

Self-portrait by Samuel Reader, an early settler and chronicler of territorial life in Kansas. This watercolor was executed in 1908, but based on an early daguerreotype photograph. Reader was an avid diarist who drew in his diaries and, later, his autobiography. During his lifetime, Samuel Reader was best known for his drawings and paintings of the Battle of the Big Blue and other Civil War experiences in Kansas.

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Eagle wheat weaving

Banbury, Joyce

Wheat weaving artist Joyce Banbury presented this eagle to Governor John Carlin in Topeka on August 18, 1986. The weaving was given on behalf of the Kansas Wheat Commission (KWC) to recognize Governor Carlin?s support for wheat producers. Joyce Banbury, of Russell, Kansas, was commissioned by KWC to complete the weaving. She was a skilled artist who wrote books on wheat weaving and was frequently featured in craft magazines. Banbury and her son specialized in growing vintage wheat breeds with long stems suitable for weaving. The eagle took two days to weave and it is made from a vintage hard winter wheat grown by Banbury on her Russell farm.

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Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station logo

Bosin, Blackbear

Wolf Creek Nuclear Generating Station corporate insignia designed by artist Blackbear Bosin. Completed in 1985 after years of debate over nuclear power, the Wolf Creek Generating Station is located near Burlington, Kansas. Plant owner?s commissioned American-Indian artist Blackbear Bosin to design this corporate insignia. In the mythological design, he included the wolf, a great provider, and the Sirius Star, a symbol of heat, to promote the positive aspects of the plant. Bosin was born of Kiowa and Comanche heritage in Oklahoma. He served in the Marines during WWII and worked as an illustrator in Wichita. This poster, signed by Bosin, was given to Governor John Carlin for his support of the Wolf Creek Station.

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Tea service

This silver tea set was given to Reverend Joseph E. and Nancy Jane (McPherson) Hopkins for their 25th wedding anniversary in 1903. The couple moved to Kansas from Illinois in the late 1870s. Their religious service took them to a number of churches around the state. In 1903, they served at the Methodist Church in Sedan where church members presented them with this tea service for their silver wedding anniversary. The set was put to good use the following year when the Hopkins hosted temperance advocate Carry A. Nation for lunch at their home.

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Colmery desk

Wooden desk with green leather top. Harry W. Colmery (1890-1979) sat at this desk at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. while hand-writing the first draft of what would become the Serviceman?s Readjustment Act of 1944, also known as the G.I. Bill of Rights, over a period of five months. The desk was later moved to Colmery's law office in Topeka.

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Portrait of John R. Brinkley

McColloch, Clarisa "Cassie" V. (Joseph)

Hand-colored photograph of John R. Brinkley. Taken during one of his campaigns for Governor. By Clarisa "Cassie" V. McColloch of McPherson (1877-1946).

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