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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Samuel L. Adair's sermon records, 1855-1860

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

This is a record of sermons given by Samuel L. Adair. The information includes the biblical text, the date, the place where the sermon was given, and the subject (including funeral sermons) for sermons delivered between 1855 and 1860. Later entries also include brief remarks. Many of the sermons were given in homes, so these locations provide some idea of the neighborhood. This item is a subset (pages 25-53) of Adair's full sermon records.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown from Osawatomie on October 2, 1857, to explain why he could not come see Brown in Iowa. Much of letter describes the general poor state of health in his locale, but he also comments on the political and especially the prospects for free state success in the upcoming election--Adair was not optimistic.

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Samuel Lyle Adair to John Brown

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

From Osawatomie, Samuel Adair wrote his brother-in-law John Brown regarding monies Adair had received for the "free State men in Kansas" and specifies how these funds were distributed.

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S. L. Adair to the friends of Christ

Adair, Samuel Lyle

This letter reported on the current religious situation in Osawatomie, Kansas Territory. According to the author, a missionary with the American Missionary Association, the residents had begun the preliminary steps for organizing a church. In Osawatomie there were a number of Baptists, Congregationalists, and Wesleyans, along with a large group who "make no profession of religion." Adair also wrote about the sickness that prevented more formal organization.

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Samuel L. Adair to S. S. Jocelyn

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair and his family had just arrived in Kansas City, Missouri. This appears to be a draft of a letter he sent to Reverend S. S. Jocelyn of the American Missionary Society to describe the poor conditions for settlers in Kansas Territory, his and his wife's illnesses, and that the doctor who treated them owned slaves.

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Sarah Brown to William Brown

Brown, Sarah

A letter written by Sarah Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was in college in New York. The first part of her letter discusses the presence of the Kansas First in Lawrence. She describes the soldiers as "rough" and notes the proslavery attitude of the regiment, which leads them to abuse African Americans living in Lawrence. Sarah goes on to discuss her views on the need for immediate emancipation. She discusses family issues such as the death of her cousin and a scrapbook she was making with her sister, Mary. The last portion of the letter discusses Sarah's interest in botany and local plants. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from Topeka, Kansas Territory to his wife, Mary Holliday, who had returned to Meadville, Pennsylvania to give birth to their second child, Charles. Cyrus had been joined in Kansas Territory by his mother and two brothers, James T. and George K. Holliday. Cyrus sadly told of his mother's death at George's home in Wakarusa, Kansas Territory. He suggested that Mary wait to return to Topeka until May 1st, when Alfred Huidekoper of Meadville would issue him a loan. Cyrus also mentioned his political aspirations and two upcoming elections, the first at the Osawatomie Republican Convention, the second for delegates to the Wyandotte Constitutional Convention.

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Samuel L. Adair to Zu Adams

Adair, Samuel Lyle, 1811-1898

Samuel Adair, Osawatomie, Kansas, described the two slaves that he had encountered. One was an eight to ten year old boy that had been hired by a merchant from Kansas City. The other slave of which he was aware was a woman owned by an Indian interpreter named Baptiste. This item is from information collected by Miss Zu Adams in 1895. She was researching the topic of slaves in Kansas and contacted a number of early Kansas settlers requesting information about slaves brought to Kansas Territory. While all of the information she collected was based on reminiscences, it still provides useful information that is difficult, if not impossible, to find elsewhere. Miss Adams and her father F. G. Adams were employees of the Kansas State Historical Society and the information received was donated to that institution.

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John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902

This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Isaac Tichenor Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Douglass Denison, 1812-1890

Ellen Goodnow wrote to her husband, Isaac Goodnow, from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, briefly relating the news of a friend's sudden death. She attached a list of items she wished Isaac to purchase while he was in the East, which mostly consisted of clothing items, but also included a clock and a microscope.

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