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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 12 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Kansas Relief Committee, newspaper article

Smith, I. N.

This article, published in the Haverhill, Massachusetts Tri-Weekly Publisher, lists the contributions collected by their local Kansas Relief Committee. A number of different churches in the area donated cash, and the committee also sent varied articles of clothing (listed in the article) to General S.C. Pomeroy of Atchison.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote to Mary from Chicago, Illinois, one stop along his journey to Washington, D. C. where he would lobby Congress for assistance with the Atchison and Topeka Railroad. He gave details of his journey and mentioned several people he had or planned to visit en route to Washington. Kansas Territory was suffering an especially severe winter.

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Cyrus Kurtz Holliday to Mary Dillon Holliday

Holliday, Cyrus Kurtz, 1826-1900

Cyrus K. Holliday wrote from La Porte, Indiana to his wife, Mary Holliday, in Topeka, Kansas Territory. On his way to Washington, D. C. he planned to collect a debt. A friend had given him railway passes to Pittsburgh. The contrast between the quality of life in the northern states and Kansas Territory saddened Cyrus, who quoted a verse. He gave instructions to Mary concerning the livestock and farmland. In a postscript, he emphasized that she save the eyes of potatoes.

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Mary Dillon Holliday to Cyrus Kurtz Holliday

Holliday, Mary Dillon, 1833-1908

Mary Holliday wrote from Topeka to her husband, Cyrus K. Holliday, in Washington, D. C. She described farm and financial difficulties, especially her frustration with John, an incompetent hired hand. She also considered releasing her "girl" to save money and taking in Sister Tite as an unpaid but potentially helpful guest. Mary requested instructions concerning lumber, asked for seeds and carpets, and mentioned local happenings. She hoped that the statehood of Kansas would encourage Cyrus to return quickly. The letter has no signature.

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William Addison Phillips

Portrait of William Addison Phillips, an author, lawyer, journalist and politician. In 1857, Phillips attended the Constitution Convention at Topeka and the Free State Conventions at Centropolis, Lawrence, and Grasshopper Falls. He founded the town of Salina in April, 1858. In that same month and year, Phillips was nominated at the Topeka Free-State Convention under the Leavenworth Constitution to serve as a supreme court judge. He attended the Convention at Osawatomie and the Republican State Convention at Lawrence in 1859. Phillips served in the Kansas Volunteer Regiments and rose to the rank of colonel. From March 4, 1873 to March 3, 1875 Phillips was an at large representative to the United States Congress and from March 4, 1875 to March 3, 1879 he represented the First District.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook and their three eldest children. He was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon, Lawrence, Kansas.

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Hugh A. Cook with his wife and children

Lamon, W. H.

Portrait of Mr. & Mrs. Hugh A. Cook with three children and their dog. Cook was the second Sheriff of Franklin County, Kansas. Photo taken by W. H. Lamon of Lawrence, Kansas.

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John Stillman Brown to John L. Rupur

Brown, John Stillman, 1806-1902

This letter was written by John Stillman Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to John L. Rupur. Brown gives a detailed and emotional account of William Quantrill's August 21, 1863, raid on Lawrence. Brown lists individual men and groups such as African Americans and Germans who were killed in the attack. He witnessed much of the violence from a hill above the city, and describes the destruction of life and property. Brown mentions that the town had no warning before the attack and that there was a second panic the following evening when townspeople feared another raid. He also describes how the community's churches came together for a memorial service. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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M.R. Brown to William Brown

Brown, Mary Ripley, d. 1878

A letter written from Lawrence, Kansas, by M.R. Brown, addressed to her son, William Brown, who was in college in New York. Brown begins by discussing the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. She discusses the 300 African Americans who had fled slavery and were now living in Lawrence, and the efforts of an African-American minister in the community. Brown expresses fear that Lawrence would be attacked by Missourians. She also gives news of Leigh R. Webber, a Kansas soldier who often wrote to members of the Brown family.

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Sarah Brown to William Brown

Brown, Sarah

A letter written by Sarah Brown from Lawrence, Kansas, addressed to her brother, William Brown, who was in college in New York. The first part of her letter discusses the presence of the Kansas First in Lawrence. She describes the soldiers as "rough" and notes the proslavery attitude of the regiment, which leads them to abuse African Americans living in Lawrence. Sarah goes on to discuss her views on the need for immediate emancipation. She discusses family issues such as the death of her cousin and a scrapbook she was making with her sister, Mary. The last portion of the letter discusses Sarah's interest in botany and local plants. A complete transcription is available by clicking "Text Version" below.

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