Jump to Navigation

Facet Browse

Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
Thematic Time Period -- Immigration and Settlement, 1854 - 1890 (Remove)
Home and Family (Remove)
Agriculture -- Crops (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
People (Remove)
Page 1 of 4, showing 10 records out of 32 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4|

Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

James M. Hunter to Thomas Nesbit Stinson

Hunter, James M.

James M. Hunter, writing from Westport, Missouri, informed Thomas N. Stinson about a joint land speculation deal involving lots in Tecumseh, KT. Hunter alluded to Governor Andrew Reeder's involvement in the speculative venture.

previewthumb

Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison

Denison, Henry

Henry Denison wrote from Bluemont College in Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle Joseph Denison, a Trustee of the College. Henry informed him that dry summer conditions had significantly impeded crop growth. The drought also affected the construction of the College, as the plasterers depended on the water supply of a nearby creek to mix their plaster; carpenters, however, moved forward with their work. Henry closed with a mention of a recent eclipse.

previewthumb

S.T. Shore, testimony

This testimony, a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, was collected by the National Kansas Committee under the leadership of Thaddeus Hyatt. Although Captain Shore was a free state militia captain and was active during the border warfare of 1856, this account focuses on his personal life and his perceptions of the Kansas Territory rather than upon his political or military experiences. The testimony begins with general information about his family, claim, etc., and then proceeds to his personal opinion of the land and vegetation in Kansas.

previewthumb

Ellen Douglas Denison Goodnow to Harriet Goodnow

Goodnow, Ellen Denison (Mrs. Isaac T.)

Ellen Goodnow, wife of Isaac Goodnow, wrote to her sister-in-law, Harriet, in New England. In this mostly personal letter, Goodnow reports on the joys and limitations of life in Kansas Territory, stating "I can say truly that I enjoy life as well here as I ever did anywhere." She did not anticipate trouble from border ruffians in their area, as her family's settlement was "too far from Missouri, too near Fort Riley", telling Harriet she would be "enraptured. . .in this country"; Ellen looked forward to a visit from her.

previewthumb

Henry L. Denison to Joseph Denison

Denison, Henry

Henry Denison wrote from Manhattan, Kansas Territory, to his uncle, Joseph Denison, who was traveling away from home. Henry reported that the cornerstone of Bluemont College had been laid the day before, and described the festivities, including speeches and the planting of a kind of time capsule behind the cornerstone. He added that crops had sprouted and were growing beautifully; emigrants continued to pass through on their way to Pikes Peak.

previewthumb

John James Ingalls to Elias T. Ingalls

Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900

Ingalls devoted much of his April 3, 1860, letter from Sumner to the territory's agricultural prospects, which were still not particularly good: "Corn, pork, and hides" were Kansas's only exports, and they were not very profitable as prices were low. "Considerable attention," wrote Ingalls, "is being paid to the hemp crop" and the wheat seemed to be doing pretty well; various kinds of fruit also "flourishes. . . . I have never seen finer apples than the farmers across the river bring to market. . . . But little is raised in Kansas yet, though much attention is being given to 'orchardizing' this spring." Ingalls was actually considering a move to the Gold County (Colorado) for better business prospects.

previewthumb

The Kanzas region: forest, prairie, desert, mountain, vale, and river

Greene, Max.

The title page for this volume continued with "Descriptions of scenery, climate, wild productions, capabilities of soil, and commercial resources; interspersed with incidents of travel, and anecdotes illustrative of the character of the traders and red men; to which are added directions as to routes, outfit for the pioneer, and sketches of desirable localities for present settlement." A small map is opposite the title page. The "Addenda" included several "Laws Governing Kanzas," a section on the objects and plans of an Emigrant Aid Company, information about the American Settlement Company, and prices for various items in Lawrence. Also included in the "Addenda" was the text of the Kansas Nebraska Act, which was not scanned as it is available elsewhere on this site.

previewthumb

History of Kansas and emigrant's guide

Chapman, J. Butler

The title page of the printed volume indicated that it contained "a description geographical and topographical--also climate, soil, productions and comparative value with other states and territories, including its political history, officers-candidates-emigrant colonies-election, abolition, squatter and pro-slavery contentions and inquisitions; with the prospects of the territory for freedom or slavery." Mr. Chapman was a resident of the territory and the information in the booklet was compiled by traveling through Kansas Territory in 1854. The description covers most of the territory and includes information about Native American tribes and lands.

previewthumb

S.H. Moore, reminiscences

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This testimony made up a portion of the Journal of Investigations in Kansas, a collection of personal reminiscences that was apparently recorded by Thaddeus Hyatt, president of the National Kansas Committee. This particular account relates the experience of S. H. Moore, a resident of Ottawa, Kansas Territory. Mr. Moore describes the land, vegetation, etc. around Ottawa and mentions various settlers from the area.

previewthumb

Thaddeus Hyatt to Amos Adams Lawrence

Hyatt, Thaddeus

This letter was written from New York by the president of the National Kansas Committee, Thaddeus Hyatt. He was writing to Amos Lawrence about the committee's efforts to relieve the suffering of free state settlers in Kansas Territory. Apparently, a shipment of clothing to Kansas contained a number of articles that were well worn and of little use. Hyatt also spoke of the need for agricultural implements, cattle, and seeds to end the suffering of the settlers.

previewthumb
<< previous| 1 | 2 | 3 | 4|

Date -- 1854-1860

Home and Family

Agriculture -- Crops

Type of Material

People

Agriculture

Built Environment

Business and Industry

Collections

Community Life

Education

Environment

Government and Politics

Military

Objects and Artifacts

Places

Thematic Time Period

Transportation