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Date -- 1854-1860 (Remove)
Thematic Time Period -- Civil War, 1861 - 1865 (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 27 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Ephraim Nute

Portrait of Rev. Ephraim Nute. He was a Unitarian minister in Lawrence, Kansas Territory. Nute served as chaplain for the Territorial Legislature at Lecompton and was a chaplain for the First Regiment of the Kansas Volunteers.

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Blood lancet

Wiegand and Snowden

This brass lancet with wooden case was made by Wiegand and Snowden of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania sometime between 1820 and 1880. The brass lever on its side releases the blade. The donor claimed the lancet was used by Dr. James Haller, who practiced in Middletown, Ohio, in the 1840s and 1850s. He later was a surgeon with General William T. Sherman's army during the Civil War.

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James Barnes Whitaker correspondence

This collection includes materials related to all aspects of James Barnes Whitaker's professional life, including his real estate business and his legal career, particularly for the pensioners he helped. He came to Tecumseh, Shawnee County in 1856 and worked there as a surveyor. In 1857, he moved to Topeka where he remained, serving as county sheriff, surveyor, and Topeka city engineer. He owned an abstract and real estate business in Topeka and was an attorney, representing numerous Civil War veterans in obtaining disability pensions, many of whom served in Kansas units. The collection consists of Whitaker's correspondence (arranged chronologically) and Whitaker's 1857 certificate of appointment as a U.S. Deputy Marshal.

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James Blood correspondence

James Blood was involved with the first party of New England Emigrant Aid Company settlers who arrived to Kansas in late July 1854. Blood was actively engaged from the beginning in the free-state movement. He served as treasurer of the Kansas State Central Committee, 1856-1857, as a member of the Topeka legislature, 1856, as the first mayor of Lawrence in 1857, as a member of the central territorial committee at the Republican Party's organizing convention in May 1859, as county treasurer in the early 1860s, and as a representative from Lawrence in the 1869 state legislature. He died in Lawrence on February 4, 1891. This folder of correspondence focuses on the years 1854 to 1861, with some letters discussing border problems with Missouri and the need for additional troops and artillery.

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James Henry Lane, United States Senator from Kansas

Portrait of James Henry Lane, 1814-1866, United States Senator from Kansas, 1861-1866.

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George Armstrong Custer

This formal portrait shows George Armstrong Custer (1839-1876). Custer, a United States army cavalry officer, is remembered for commanding the U.S. Seventh Cavalry Regiment into the Battle of the Little Bighorn, on June 25, 1876, in which all of his soldiers and Custer himself were attacked and killed by a coalition of Plains Indians.

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George Armstrong Custer

Brady's National Portrait Galleries

This lithograph signed by Elizabeth A Custer shows her husband George Armstrong Custer, (1839-1876). As a United States army cavalry officer he is remembered for commanding the U.S. Seventh Cavalry Regiment into the Battle of the Little Bighorn, on June 25, 1876, in which all of his soldiers and Custer himself were attacked and killed by a coalition of Plains Indians.

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Bleeding cup

This bloodletting cup was owned by Dr. James Haller (1824-1908). Haller practiced medicine in Middletown, Ohio, in the 1840s and 1850s, and was a surgeon during the Civil War with the 38th Ohio Infantry from July 24, 1861 to Jan 4, 1865. He was promoted to Assistant Surgeon July 13, 1863. After the war, Dr. Haller and his family moved to Burlingame, Kansas where he continued to practice medicine. Cups were used to perform the medical treatment of bleeding. The glass cup was heated and placed on the skin. Its cooling created a vacuum, causing the skin to become red and swollen and signaling to the physician that the blood had risen to the surface of the skin. Then a lancet was used to release the "bad" blood from the body.

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James Montgomery

Portrait of James Montgomery, who came to Linn County, Kansas Territory, early in the territorial period and became active in the free state cause. When the Civil War started, Montgomery joined the regular service, being elected colonel of the Third Kansas Volunteer Infantry, a part of "Lane's Brigade." When the Third, which gained quite a reputation along with the rest of the brigade for its jayhawking, was consolidated with some other units to form the Tenth Kansas Volunteer Infantry in April 1862, Montgomery remained the regiment's colonel. In early 1863, however, he transferred to the Second Regiment, South Carolina Colored Volunteers, and helped fill its ranks with black recruits. In 1864 he resigned his commission, returned to Kansas, and ended his military career as colonel of the Sixth Kansas State Militia. After the war, Montgomery returned to his Linn County farm, where he died, December 6, 1871.

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Abraham Lincoln

A portrait of Abraham Lincoln. In December 1859, Lincoln traveled to the Kansas Territory and spoke at Elwood, Troy, Doniphan, Atchison, and Leavenworth. His speeches covered several issues including preventing the expansion of slavery, the theory of popular sovereignty, and the evils of states seceding from the Union. In 1860, Lincoln received the Republican party's nomination for president. Although Kansans liked him the delegation from the territory did not support his nomination. He won the election, and on February 22, 1861, at Independence Hall, Philadelphia, PA, Lincoln raised the United States flag bearing a 34th star, honoring Kansas as the newest state.

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