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Date -- 1880s (Remove)
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Page 1 of 36, showing 10 records out of 351 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

John Alexander Martin, governor of Kansas

This black and white photograph shows the tenth Governor of Kansas John Alexander Martin on the steps of the capitol in Topeka, Kansas with state office employees.

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William Barclay (Bat) Masterson

Photograph of William Barclay (Bat) Masterson who was raised in Wichita, Kansas. Masterson was deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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William Barclay "Bat" Masterson

A portrait of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Masterson, who was raised in Wichita, Kansas, served as deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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William Barclay "Bat" Masterson

A photograph of William Barclay "Bat" Masterson. Masterson, who was raised in Wichita, Kansas, served as deputy sheriff in Dodge City with Wyatt Earp in 1877 and served as elected county sheriff of Ford County, Kansas, from 1877-1879.

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C. H. Strieby's blacksmith shop, Council Grove, Kansas

These three black and white photographs show C. H. Strieby's blacksmith shop in Council Grove, Kansas.

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Samuel Reader lanternslide

Reader, Samuel J.

Hand painted lanternslide depicting a dentist's office, inside a handmade wood frame. Slide depicts a man having a tooth pulled by a dentist. The slide can be manipulated so the dentist appears to yank the tooth with a forceps. Part of a collection made by Samuel Reader between 1866 and 1913. Reader was a Kansas farmer who was active in the early Topeka community. He built two homes, served in the Civil War, and wrote in a diary nearly every day for 64 years. Reader began painting slides in 1866 and continued throughout much of his life, holding magic lantern shows for the local community in his house and at church.

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Frederic Remington

Frederic Remington took art classes as a freshman at Yale. He decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884 he married Eva Caten. Unhappy with Remington's cartoons at the time and his involvement in the saloon, she returned to New York. Alone amid failing businesses, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Frederic Remington

A photograph of Frederic Remington working in his studio. He took art classes as a freshman at Yale, and he decided he was less interested in still life and more fascinated with action drawings. At the age of nineteen he decided to head west in search of frontier adventure and fortune. Remington lived in Kansas from 1883 to 1885. He first invested in a sheep ranch near Peabody. He continued his sketching, but soon found he disliked ranch life. Remington sold his interest in the ranch and returned east to acquire more money. He returned to Kansas City and bought a hardware store, also becoming a silent partner in a saloon. In 1884, he married Eva Caten. She became unhappy with Remington's cartoons and his involvement in the saloon so she left and returned to New York. Alone amid a failing business, Remington was motivated to rely on his sketches for income. Virtually a self-taught artist, Remington was soon receiving national acclaim for his paintings and illustrations. In 1886 Remington's work was reproduced on a full page in Harper's Weekly. During the early 1890s Remington illustrated books and articles by such famous authors as Theodore Roosevelt and Francis Parkman. By 1895 Remington had begun sculpting the bronzes of cowboys and American Indians for which he is now legendary. He died at the age of 48 in 1909.

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Solomon Miller

A photograph of Solomon Miller, who was born in Lafayette, Indiana, in 1831 and raised in Prable County, Ohio. Solomon Miller came to Kansas Territory and founded the Kansas Chief newspaper at White Cloud in 1857. In 1872 Miller moved the Chief to Troy, Kansas. Miller served in both the Kansas House and Senate. He lived and worked in Troy until his death in 1897.

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Tamping bar

Nels Ferguson, a Swedish immigrant, used this steel tamping bar in his work as a stonemason. He was involved in the construction of the Kansas Statehouse and the Topeka State Hospital. Ferguson later settled with his family in Richland Township in Jewell County, Kansas. He used his stonemason tools in the construction of his stone farmstead, Rock Hill Farm.

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