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Date -- 1890s (Remove)
Date (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Journalists (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions (Remove)
Type of Material -- Photographs (Remove)
Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Allen White

Portrait of William Allen white, editor and owner of the Emporia Gazette newspaper, Emporia, Kansas.

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William Allen White

Loomis, F. A.

Portrait of William Allen White, editor of the Emporia Gazette. The photograph was taken by F. A. Loomis, 522 Commercial Street, Emproia, KS.

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Annie (Le Porte) Diggs

Snyder

A portrait of Annie (Le Porte) Diggs, who was born in 1848 in Canada to an American mother and French father. Two years later the family moved to New Jersey, where she attended school. Diggs moved to Lawrence, Kansas, in 1873 and married Alvin S. Diggs shortly thereafter. While in Kansas, Diggs began to attend the local Unitarian Church and developed a strong sense of moral responsibility that prompted her to work for temperance and women?s suffrage. During 1882, Diggs and her husband published the newspaper Kansas Liberal, and beginning in 1890 she was the associate editor of the Alliance Advocate. As a radical reformer seeking to wipe out injustice, Diggs also allied herself with the Farmer?s Alliance, aiding in the creation of the People's (Populist) Party, serving on the Populist National Committee, and supporting the fusion of the Populist and Democratic parties in the 1898 election. Throughout this time she continued to work actively for women?s voting rights and served in the Kansas Equal Suffrage Association. In 1898, she was appointed the state librarian of Kansas, and she was also elected president of Kansas Press Women in 1905. Diggs moved to New York City in 1906, where she worked on two publications: The Story of Jerry Simpson (1908) and Bedrock (1912). She relocated to Detroit, Michigan, in 1912 and died there on September 7, 1916.

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Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A sepia colored portrait of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individual's views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1865, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freedman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A sepia colored photo of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory.

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Richard Josiah Hinton

A black and white photo of Richard Josiah Hinton, 1830-1901. Hinton a New York journalist and an anti-slavery advocate moved to the Kansas territory, in June of 1856, to battle against the expansion of slavery in the new territory. Shortly after his arrival in Lawrence, KS, Hinton soon advocated against slavery by writing to Eastern newspapers about the turbulent affairs in the Kansas territory. The numerous newspaper articles penned by Hinton reflected the individual's views and opinions of a free-state without the institution of slavery. By the early part of 1862, Hinton was recruiting volunteers for the First Kansas Colored Infantry Regiment, and was appointed the rank of first lieutenant to the Regiment. He continued to move up in the military ranks with the promotion to captain of Company B, Second Kansas Colored on October 21, 1863. In November of 1856, Hinton mustered out of military service having reached the brevet rank of colonel. He finished the war serving as acting inspector general of the Freeman's Bureau as well as being sent to the South for secret service work ordered by President Abraham Lincoln. Following the war Hinton contributed articles to many different magazines and wrote several books, including John Brown and His Men: With Some Account of the Roads They Traveled to Reach Harpers Ferry (1894), an admiring biography of Hinton's old leader and hero. He, also, held several politically appointed positions within the federal government (i.e., United States commissioner of emigration in Europe in 1867; inspector of U.S. consulates in Europe; special agent to President Ulysses S. Grant to Vienna in 1873; special agent to the Departments of Treasury and State on the frontier and in Mexico in 1883; irrigation engineer to the U.S. Geological Survey from 1889-1890; and special agent in charge of the Department of Agriculture from 1890 to 1892.) While on business in London, England, Hinton died suddenly on December 20, 1901.

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William Bolden Townsend

This illustration shows William Bolden Townsend, (1854-?), taken from I. Garland Penn's book "The Afro-American Press". Townsend born into slavery ,in 1854, near Huntsville, Alabama overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished journalist, and lawyer. At the age of six he migrated to Kansas, in 1860, with his mother to receive a "common school education". On the completion of his education, Townsend became a teacher and taught for a brief period in Mississippi before returning to his adopted state. By 1876, he was a correspondent for the "The Colored Citizen" at Fort Scott, Kansas and associate editor, in 1878, to "The Radical" at Leavenworth, Kansas. In addition to his career as a journalist, Townsend held a number of county and state appointed offices and was active in the Republican party before he entered law school, in 1889, at the University of Kansas. When he received his degree, in 1891, Townsend established a law practice in Leavenworth County but the radical tension in the community became so dangerous that he feared for his safety and eventually left Kansas.

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Palace Drug Store, Junction City, Kansas

This photograph shows an exterior view of business buildings, including the Palace Drug Store, in Junction City, Kansas. A few men are visible standing in front of the buildings. Signs for other businesses pictured include the Tribune Printing Office; K. P. Railroad Land Office; A. C. Pierce Gent. Real Estate and Insurance Agent; Loans, Lands, and Abstracts; Furniture and Undertaking, and W. B. Teitzel and Company. Another sign above the entrance to the drug store reads, "Drugs, Chemicals, and Patent Medicines." This photograph is from the album "Views of Junction City" by Wheeler and Teitzel.

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Nelson Case

This sepia colored portrait shows Nelson Case, (1845-1921). Case a graduate from the University of Michigan settled in the town of Oswego, Kansas, in May of 1869, to practice civil and criminal law. Considered an honest and honorable lawyer among his peers, Case was appointed in June of 1880 by Governor St. John as a probate judge. He was twice re-elected to the bench but did not seek a third term. Case soon returned to practicing law and advocating for prohibition. A long time supporter of the temperance movement, he successfully banished saloons from the town of Oswego and rallied for the constitutional amendment of prohibition. Actively involved in his community, Case held a number of elected and appointed positions. He served as the city attorney of Oswego, and the editor of the Oswego Independent newspaper. Case was also a member of the Republican Party, and was appointed to the board of regents at the State Normal school in Emporia. In his spare time, he authored a number of books including "The History of Labette County" and "The Constitutional History of the United States."

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