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Page 1 of 2, showing 10 records out of 15 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

William Alfred Peffer

Leonard, J. H.

William Alfred Peffer was the first Populist senator elected to U.S. Congress. He was born in Cumberland County, Pennsylvania, on September 10, 1831. As a young man he traveled across the country, living in California, Indiana, Missouri, and Illinois. After the outbreak of Civil War, Peffer enlisted in the 83rd Illinois Infantry, entering as a private and working his way up to the rank of second lieutenant. He read law while still in the military, and after his discharge in 1865 he was admitted to the bar and began practicing law in Clarksville, Tennessee. Five years later he moved to Fredonia, Kansas, where he established another practice and edited the Fredonia Journal. Peffer served as a state senator from 1874 to 1876, and during his tenure he relocated to Coffeyville, Kansas, where he assumed editorial control of the Coffeyville Journal. Then, in 1881, he launched the Populist publication Kansas Farmer, one of his best-known contributions to this agrarian reform movement. Peffer was instrumental in the creation of the People?s (Populist) Party, serving as a Populist U.S. Senator from 1891 to 1897 and running again (unsuccessfully) for re-election in 1896. Two years later, he ran an unsuccessful campaign for Governor of Kansas, losing the election to Republican William Stanley. Peffer died in 1912 in Grenola, Kansas, at the age of 81.

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Albert Howell Horton

In 1874 Albert Howell Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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Albert Howell Horton & wife

In 1874, Albert Horton was elected to a term in the Kansas House of Representatives and in 1876 was elected to a term in the Kansas Senate. In 1876 he was appointed chief justice of the Supreme Court.

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John Lewis Waller

Martin, H. T.

This sepia colored cabinet card shows John Lewis Waller, 1850-1907. Born into slavery, Waller overcame his humble beginnings to become an accomplished lawyer, journalist, politician and diplomat. He migrated to Kansas in the spring of 1878, after hearing of Pap Singleton's efforts to colonize Blacks in the state.

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Willliam Craw Webb

Snyder's Art Gallery

This cabinet card shows William Craw Webb, (1824-1898). Webb served as a county attorney, judge to the eleventh judicial district, and superior court of Shawnee County. His career as a public servant also included tenure as Kansas' Superintendent of Insurance and clerk of the Kansas Supreme Court, (1871-1878). Webb was actively involved in politics. He served as a member of the Kansas House of Representatives from, (1870-1871). In 1890, Webb was re-elected to the Kansas and House of Representatives to serve the forty-first district of Shawnee County.

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Franklin George Adams' Residence, Topeka, Kansas

A sepia colored photo of Franklin George Adams' residence on the S.W. corner of Fifteenth and Mulvane streets in Topeka, Kansas. F. G. Adams, one of Kansas' most prominent settlers, was a free-stater and member of the Leavenworth Constitutional Convention of 1858. In 1862, he drafted the law providing for the organization of the state's agriculture society and served for three years as the society's secretary. In addition to his appointment as agriculture secretary, Adams was Clerk of the United States District Court from 1863 to 1864. Following this position, Adams was appointed United States Indian Agent to the Kickappos from 1865 to 1869. Adams' greatest and lasting contribution as a public servant was his appointment, in 1875, as secretary of the Kansas Historical Society. During his tenure as secretary, Adams dedicated his time and effort to build the society's collection of original documents for future generations to study and interpret the state's history.

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Nathaniel F. Graves

Downing, George

This cabinet card shows Nathaniel F. Graves, a lawyer and farmer from Tonganoxie, Kansas. He served as Justice of the Peace and County Attorney of Leavenworth County. In 1896, he was elected, on the Populist ticket to the Kansas House of Representatives from the sixth district of Leavenworth, Kansas,1897-1898.

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Joseph B. Tomlinson

This black and white photograph shows Joseph B. Tomlinson, (1861-1922). Tomlinson, a native of Ohio, settled in Ottawa County, Kansas in 1881, to teach school and study law in the office of D.C. Chipman in Minneapolis, Kansas. He passed the bar, in 1890, and devoted his time and energy to up-holding the law and defending citizens' rights. In 1891, Kansas Governor William Stanley appointed Tomlinson warden of the Kansas State Penitentiary in Lansing, Kansas. During his brief tenure as warden, Tomlinson successfully managed to keep over 280 convicts from striking in the penitentiary coal mines without violence or outside assistance. He resigned from the warden's position, in 1901, to return to private life. In 1903, he moved to Independence, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

This photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, 1844-1910. Stanley, a native of Ohio, settles in Jefferson County, Kansas, in 1870 to practice law. He enters public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, 1871-1872. A few years later he becomes the Sedgwick County attorney, 1874-1880. In 1880, he makes a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and serves one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, 1881-1883. Stanley resumes his political career in 1898, when he is elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He is also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. During his administration, the Kansas supreme court is increased to seven justices and funds are appropriated to finish the construction on the statehouse. Stanley leaves office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas, and to practice law. On October 13, 1910, William Eugene Stanley passes away at the age of sixty-six. He is buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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William Eugene Stanley

This photograph shows William Eugene Stanley, 1844-1910. Stanley, a native of Ohio, settles in Jefferson County, Kansas in 1870 to practice law. He enters public service, in 1871, by serving as the Jefferson County attorney, 1871-1872. A few years later he becomes the Sedgwick County attorney, 1874 to 1880. In 1880, he makes a political bid for a seat in the Kansas House of Representatives and serves one term as a Republican from the ninety-second district, 1881-1883. Stanley resumes his political career in 1898, when he is elected the fifteenth governor of Kansas. He is also re-elected in 1901 to a second term. Stanley left office on January 12, 1903 to return to private life in Wichita, Kansas and to practice law. On October 13, 1919, William Eugene Stanley passes away at the age of 66. He is buried at the Highland Cemetery in Wichita, Kansas.

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