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Thematic Time Period -- Industrialization and the National Economy, 1870 - 1920 (Remove)
Government and Politics -- State Government (Remove)
Type of Material (Remove)
Business and Industry -- Occupations/Professions -- Lawyers (Remove)
Page 1 of 1, showing 3 records out of 3 total, starting on record 1, ending on 3

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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Eugene Ware correspondence

This is a series of correspondence to and from Eugene Fitch Ware (1841-1911). Ware moved to Fort Scott, Kansas, after the Civil War and became employed at the Fort Scott Monitor. In 1879, Ware began the first of three terms in the Kansas State Senate. During his terms of office, Ware introduced bills concerning railroads, life insurance, militia, and relief and support of the poor as well as bills of a more local nature. Ware moved to Topeka in 1893 to become a partner with Charles Gleed and his brother, James, forming the law firm of Gleed, Ware and Gleed. In addition to journalism, law, and politics, Ware used the pseudonym, Ironquill, for his literary and poetic achievements. His works include "Neutralia" and "The Rhymes of Ironquill". For a complete contents list of the papers of Eugene Fitch Ware, see the External Links below.

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George W. Espey to Governor John A. Martin

George W. Espey, an agent of the Palace Drug Store in Ashland, Kansas, writes to Governor John A. Martin in Topeka asking whether he must quit selling alcohol because the county clerk does not have the proper affidavit form for him to fill out to renew his license. Espey asks for a prompt reply because the county attorney has stopped him from doing business.

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