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Page 1 of 1, showing 9 records out of 9 total, starting on record 1, ending on 9

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

Nicodemus, Kansas

This photograph captures the bustling main street in Nicodemus, Graham County, a settlement founded by African Americans in 1877. It includes a number of townspeople and the Williams Mercantile store. The building on the far left is believed to be the First Baptist Church. The new First Baptist Church was built in 1907 around this church; once the new building was completed, Nicodemus residents demolished the original church. The new building is now part of the National Parks Service historic site.

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Pottawatomie bark house

This is a photograph of a Pottawatomie bark house from around the turn of the twentieth century. Winter residences of the Pottawatomie tended to be dome-shaped and rounded.

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Mead family dugout in Ford County, Kansas

In this photograph, the L.A. Mead family stands outside their dugout located one mile north of Bloom, Kansas. In the photograph is Esther, the mother of L. A. Mead, Carl Mead, Mina Mead, Elsie Mead, Mrs. L. A. Mead, and L. A. Mead. Kneeling in front is Mrs. S. R. Mead, Sister-in-Law to L. A. Mead and Edna Mead. Dugouts such as this, as well as sod houses, were common dwelling places on the high plains of Kansas due to the lack of wood and other natural resources. This family was fortunate enough to have glass windows, wood siding, and a stovepipe; these amenities would have been considered luxuries by many pioneers out west. A photograph of the interior of this dwelling can be found at unit ID 205534.

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Mead family dugout near Bloom in Ford County, Kansas

This photograph shows the interior of the L. A. Mead family dugout near Bloom, Ford County Kansas, clearly illustrating the cramped living conditions that the family endured during their stay in this residence. An exterior view of the dwelling showing the Mead family can be found at unit ID 205533.

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Lilla Day Monroe

Lilla Day Monroe, 1858-1929, was a Kansas journalist who established and edited "The Club Woman" and "The Kansas Woman's Journal." As editor of "The Kansas Woman's Journal," Monroe solicited reminiscences of pioneer life from Kansas women, receiving hundreds of responses. She organized these reminiscences into a collection, and published many of them in the journal. She was also an active supporter of women's suffrage, being a member of the Kansas State Suffrage Association and serving as its president for several years.

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Prairie Band Pottawatomi women

Parkman, Mary

This photograph of Mrs. Frank Mazhas and her two daughters, Louise and Lizzie, was taken in 1935 as part of the New Deal Federal Indian program. These women belonged to the Prairie Band of the Pottawatomi tribe and are wearing traditional Pottawatomi clothing used for festive occasions.

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Bark house, Kickapoo Reservation

Parkman, Mary

This photograph, taken in 1935 as part of the New Deal Federal Indian program, depicts a bark house on the Kickapoo Reservation in northeast Kansas. This was the home of Marie Pewamo, who is presumably the woman standing out front. This style of house had been used since the nineteenth century by both the Kickapoo and Pottawatomi tribes.

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Robert Burgin homestead, Barber County, Kansas

This undated photograph depicts the homestead of Robert Burgin and his family, located in Barber County. Their home was constructed out of sod and wood siding.

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Albin K. Longren

A portrait of Albin K. Longren, who in 1911, constructed and flew his first pusher-type biplane, dubbed the Topeka I. That flight earned him the distinction of being the first to manufacture within Kansas a successfully-flown aircraft. This was the beginning of a lifelong career in aviation for Longren. As an aviator, he barnstormed throughout the Midwest, making a total of 1,372 exhibition flights from 1911 - 1914 without a major mishap. Longren channeled his income from barnstorming into his more serious interest of aircraft design and construction in his Topeka factory.

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