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Page 1 of 3, showing 10 records out of 27 total, starting on record 1, ending on 10

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Title | Creator | Date Made Visible | None

A.S. Wilson to Henry J. Allen

Kansas. Governor (1919-1923 : Allen)

A.S. Wilson, an attorney in Galena, Kansas, writes to Governor Henry J. Allen to indicate his interest in a law that would allow second class cities to separate the schools based on "white and colored children." He included a petition with signatures with the letter.

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State Industrial School for Boys, Topeka, Kansas

This silent film documents the State Industrial School for Boys of Topeka, Kansas, in 1935 and depicts all aspects of the institution's educational, health, recreational, vocational and boarding programs. A segment of the film shows Governor Alfred M. Landon visiting the school and making a speech. The school opened in 1881 and sought to reform boys under the age of sixteen who had committed criminal acts. The school taught boys to be farmers, dairymen, tailors, carpenters, linemen, cobblers, barbers, cooks, waiters, machinists, and engineers.

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Edward Ray Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University

Wolfe's Camera and Photo Shop

This is a photograph of Edward R. Sloan receiving a honorary doctorate of law at Washburn University. Dean Sellen is adjusting the hood and Dr. Stauffer, President of Washburn University is presenting the certificate. Sloan was born in 1883 in Seward County Nebraska. His family came to Kansas in 1886 locating in Sheridan County. Sloan graduated from Campbell College School of Law at Holton in 1904 and Washburn College Law School in 1905. He was elected county attorney of Sheridan County in the fall of 1904 and was re-elected twice while maintaining a private practice in Hoxie, Kansas. In July 1911, Sloan established with Guy L. Hursh the Holton law firm of Hursh & Sloan. In April 1912, Sloan was appointed Holton's city attorney, a position he held for 19 years. In 1930, Sloan helped establish the Topeka firm of Sloan, Hamilton and Sloan, which included his younger brother Floyd and W. Glenn Hamilton. It was the predecessor of the firm Sloan, Listrom, Eisenbarth, Sloan & Glassman. He served three terms in the Kansas House of Representatives from 1923 to 1929. In March 1931, he was appointed by Governor Woodring to fill a vacancy on the Kansas Supreme Court. Judge Sloan served the remaining 21 months of the term but opted not to seek election for another term. Later, he was appointed to the Kansas Corporation Commission and served as chairman from 1936 to 1938. In 1947, he was appointed Referee in Bankruptcy for the District of Kansas, where he served for 14 years. He was a lecturer at Washburn University Law School and compiled a textbook on bankruptcy.

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Benjamin Franklin Mudge

Tintype portrait of Benjamin Franklin Mudge, 1817-1879, who was the first State Geologist of Kansas. In 1862, geologist Mudge was invited to deliver a series of lectures before the Kansas legislature. The body passed legislation to organize a state geological survey and decided to make Mudge the state geologist, "an honor," he said, "entirely unsought, yet thoroughly enjoyed." Mudge was elected professor of geology and associated sciences at the Kansas State Agricultural College. He published the first "Geology of Kansas," a 65-page report issued in 1866, and the first geological map of the state in 1875. Born in Maine in 1817, Mudge grew up in Massachusetts, attending academies there and graduating from Wesleyan University in Connecticut in 1840. Mudge studied natural science and history, but also completed the classical course and studied law. He was admitted to the bar and embarked on a political and legal career, but Mudge always maintained his interest in geology and natural history. During the summer of 1861, in order to demonstrate his antislavery convictions, Mudge moved his family to Quindaro, Wyandotte County, Kansas, a bustling river town with a reputation as an important point on the Underground Railroad and as a stronghold of the free-state movement during the preceding years. After leaving the agricultural college in 1873, Mudge collected specimens for Yale University and was named geologist under the State Board of Agriculture. Mudge also was a founding member of the Kansas Natural History Society, which became the Kansas Academy of Science. Mudge, who gathered the nucleus of the college's mineral collection, was later remembered as a one of the foremost pioneer scientists of Kansas. A biographer said he was "outstanding not only as a great explorer and collector of geological and paleontological specimens," he was also "recognized as an enthusiastic and inspiring teacher and was highly esteemed by the people of the State."

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Glee S. Smith, Jr.

This is a photograph of Glee S. Smith, Jr. who lived and practiced law in Larned, Kansas, and later Lawrence, Kansas. He was born in Rozel, Kansas, on April 29, 1921. Smith obtained his bachelors and law degrees from the University of Kansas and was a member of Delta Tau Delta fraternity. He served as a First Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps during World War II. Smith served twelve years on the Larned Board of Education and four years as county attorney. He also served as a member on many philanthropic and business corporate boards, including two life insurance companies and bank boards in other cities. He served 16 years in the Kansas State Senate with eight years as President of the Senate. Later, he served on the Kansas Board of Regents. In 1975, he was appointed by President Ford to the Board of the National Legal Services Corporation. Smith served ten years as a member of the Board of Governors of the Kansas Bar Association and ten years as one of three Kansas delegates to the House of Delegates of the American Bar Association.

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Ephraim Nute to Amos Adams Lawrence

Nute, Ephraim

Transcription of a letter from the Amos Adams Lawrence Collection, Massachusetts Historical Society. Ephraim Nute, minister of the Lawrence Unitarian Church, wrote to Amos A. Lawrence in Massachusetts, regarding the subject of a college. A well-attended town meeting had been held in which the idea had been discussed, though all seemed only "a castle in the air" but for Lawrence's "liberal offer" (presumably of funding) which was the "first step toward the realization of his project." The general opinion of the people was that the college should be constructed outside the town limits "on the high prairie or table land." Nute also mentioned the steps being taken to establish free public schools in the city, of upper and lower grades.

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Benjamin Franklin Mudge

DaLee, A.G.

A carte de visite of Benjamin Franklin Mudge, 1817-1879, who was the first State Geologist of Kansas. Mudge was elected professor of geology and associated sciences at the Kansas State Agricultural College. He published the first "Geology of Kansas" a sixty-five page report issued in 1866, and the first geological map of the state in 1875. He was also a founding member of the Kansas Natural History Society which became the Kansas Academy of Science. Mudge, who gathered the nucleus of the college's mineral collection, was later remembered as one of the foremost pioneer scientists of Kansas.

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Roseline Cunningham to John P. St. John

Cunningham, Roseline

Roseline Cunningham, a black schoolteacher from Westpoint, Mississippi, wrote this letter to Kansas governor John St. John concerning emigration to Kansas. Cunningham, like many other Exodusters, was unable to make a living in the South and sought information about settling in Kansas. She also wanted to know if there was a governmental agency or society that would help her (and her neighbors) cover the cost of emigration. Governor St. John served on the board of the Kansas Freedmen?s Relief Association.

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Paul E. Wilson to T. Justin Moore

Wilson, Paul E

In this letter, assistant attorney general Paul Wilson responded to T. Justin Moore?s query about the desegregation case Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka. Wilson writes that he is not fully informed of the current situation in Topeka, but that he believes the school board is beginning the integration process in anticipation of the court?s ruling that segregation is unconstitutional. He also mentioned that some contracts for African-American teachers had not been renewed because the board felt that many white parents would not want their children to be taught by black teachers. Wilson was a defense attorney for the Topeka school board and he argued their case before the Supreme Court. On May 17, 1954, Chief Justice Earl Warren handed down the ruling that segregated educational facilities were indeed unconstitutional.

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President Richard Nixon and Governor Robert Docking

Stauffer Publications

This black and white photograph shows President Richard Nixon and Governor Robert Docking at Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas. President Nixon was delivering his speech "It's Time to Stand up and Be Counted" at the annual Landon Lecture Series held each academic year to honor former Governor Alf Landon. Accompanying the President for his speech is First Lady Pat Nixon to his left, Theo Landon, and former Governor Alf Landon, Governor Docking, and Kansas First Lady Meredith Docking to his right.

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